The 10 Best Places to Live in Georgia

If you’re looking for some good old-fashioned Southern hospitality, look no further than Georgia. The Peach State has plenty of small-town charm to welcome you in, as well as big-city development, artistic expression and innovation.

Georgia is also steeped in history as one of the 13 original colonies and a battleground for much of the Civil War. While General Sherman’s infamous March to the Sea burned much of Georgia to the ground, many cities have preserved or restored much of the beautiful Antebellum architecture.

Whether you’re in need of some country roads or bustling city blocks, there’s a little something for everyone.

Some Common Factors

All of the communities described here have certain characteristics in common. Here are a few:

  1. Taxes. Georgia’s state income tax ranges from 1% to 5.75%, compared to the national average state income tax of 4.6%. The state and local sales tax combined rate ranges from 4.0% to 8.9%, compared to the national average of 6.2%. Georgia has a low average effective property tax rate at 0.87%.
  2. Climate. Most of Georgia is hot and humid, especially in the summer, with four distinct seasons and cold to mild winters. We will mention any climatic anomalies for specific areas if they exist.

For each community below, we assign a HOMEiA Score, which provides an overall assessment of its safety and appeal as a place to call home.

Here’re 10 best cities to live in Georgia.

1. Alpharetta

HOMEiA Score: 95/100

  • Population: 65,818 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 26% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $422,800/$113,802 = 3.72 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $113,802/$17,412 = 6.54 (renting homes is very affordable)

Alpharetta is located about 20 miles north of downtown Atlanta. It has easy access to multiple State Route highways: SR-400, SR-9, SR-120, SR-372 and SR-140. The city is known as a white-collar area, and many of the neighborhoods boast exclusive clubs and amenities.

a. Size and Population

Alpharetta has a population of 65,818 (2020) spread over a 27.27-square-mile area. The population density is 2,413.6 per square mile.

The population in Alpharetta grew by 14.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Alpharetta.

ALPHARETTA MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $113,802

Alpharetta Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 26% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 15% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 33% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 18% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Alpharetta Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$422,800 $27,828 $17,412

Alpharetta shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.72, based on a median home value of $422,800 and a median household income of $113,802. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Alpharetta area.

Alpharetta shows an income to rent ratio of 6.54, based on a median household income of $113,802 and an annual spend of $17,412. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Alpharetta.

In Alpharetta, 66.4% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Alpharetta, GA:

The best neighborhoods to live in Alpharetta include the following:

  • Windward (Average Home Value: $500,000 to $1+ million)
    Windward is an upscale neighborhood nestled along Lake Windward. Residents have access to a plethora of recreational and social amenities, including private clubs, parks and more. While some homes go for as much as $4 million, others are much less expensive.
  • City Center (Average Home Value: $300,000 to $500,000)
    Alpharetta’s city center is a mixed-use development that combines historic structures with modern ones. Residents enjoy easy access to restaurants, shops, office spaces, walking trails and much more.
  • Avalon (Average Home Value: $250,000 to $500,000+)
    Another mixed-use development, Avalon is located near downtown Alpharetta. You can even walk there on the 1-mile trail known as Alpha Loop. In addition to residences, Avalon features a theater, hotel and retail shops.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Alpharetta is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 5.5%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Alpharetta area include McKesson Technology Solutions, AT&T, ADP, Fisery, Verizon and Hewlett Packard.

The Alpharetta area has an average commute time of 29.0 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Alpharetta is a blend of the historic and the modern. Here are a few ways to enjoy the scenery, shopping and friendly atmosphere:

  • Avalon. More than just a residential area, Avalon is a center for shopping, eating, business and leisure.
  • Big Creek Greenway. This linear park follows an 8-mile concrete path through Alpharetta’s woods. Observe the wildlife as you walk, jog, bike or skate along.
  • Downtown Historic District. Stroll among the historic and restored structures, some of which date back to the 19th century.
  • Wills Park Equestrian Center. If you’re interested in horse shows, rodeos, polo or other events of the kind, the equestrian center has you covered.
  • Walk of Memories. This brick walkway honors more than 8,000 U.S. veterans and their families and friends.

c. Education

There are 28 public schools and 95 private schools in the Alpharetta area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are four public and six private schools.

Overall, the Alpharetta area has an excellent educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges in the Alpharetta area include Gwinnett Technical College and Georgia State University’s Alpharetta Center.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Alpharetta was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was 69.2%, significantly above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Northside Hospital’s Alpharetta campus covers 140 acres and offers a wide array of outpatient and community services.

Alpharetta has 1.12 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 14.74 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

2. Atlanta 

HOMEiA Score: 85/100

  • Population: 498,715 | Rank Last Year: #7
  • Cost of Living: 9% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $290,400/$59,548 = 4.88 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $59,548/$13,836 = 4.30 (renting homes is affordable)

Georgia’s capital city, Atlanta, is located in northwest Georgia and is known for its rich, diverse history. The city is mostly encircled by the Perimeter, and it can also be accessed by three other major interstates: I-85, I-20 and I-75. Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport is just 10 miles south of downtown.

a. Size and Population

Atlanta has a population of 498,715 (2020) spread over a 136.31-square-mile area. The population density is 3,659 per square mile.

The population in Atlanta grew by 18.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, well above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Atlanta.

ATLANTA MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $59,548

Atlanta Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 9% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 7% Higher than Decatur, Georgia
  • 42% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 2% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Atlanta Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$290,400 $22,992 $13,836

Atlanta shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 4.88, based on a median home value of $290,400 and a median household income of $59,548. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is expensive to buy homes in the Atlanta area.

Atlanta shows an income to rent ratio of 4.30, based on a median household income of $59,548 and an annual spend of $13,836. The U.S. average is 3.46. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Atlanta.

In Atlanta, 43.5% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Atlanta, GA:

The best neighborhoods to live in Atlanta include the following:

  • Buckhead (Average Home Value: $200,000 to $1.5+ million)
    Buckhead, a neighborhood in the northern part of Atlanta, makes up roughly one-fifth of the city. It boasts a skyline of impressive high-rise buildings along with tree-filled residential areas.
  • Midtown (Average Home Value: $200,000 to $600,000+)
    Midtown is located just north of downtown. It’s a cultural hub that’s home to the Fox Theatre, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and other museums and art centers.
  • Downtown (Average Home Value: $150,000 to $750,000+)
    Atlanta’s city center contains some of its tallest buildings, many tourist attractions, government buildings (county, state, and federal) and much more.
  • Eastside (Average Home Value: $300,000 to $700,000+)
    As its name implies, Eastside is in the eastern part of Atlanta. It’s known as a unique, artsy part of town and features the Atlanta Beltline, a redevelopment project designed to connect neighborhoods with walking trails, parks and public transit.
  • West Midtown/Westside (Average Home Value: $100,000 to $400,000+)
    Located roughly west of Midtown, this neighborhood can be known as either West Midtown or Westside. It’s generally considered to be west of Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and south of Buckhead.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Atlanta is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 20.8%, is well above the national average of 10.5% and above the Georgia average of 13.3%.

There are a slew of Fortune 500 companies based in Atlanta, including Coca-Cola, Delta Air Lines, AT&T, Kroger, Marriott International and UPS. There are also large employers in the education and healthcare sectors, with Emory University, Emory Healthcare, Piedmont Healthcare and Northside Healthcare being among the most prominent.

The Atlanta area has an average commute time of 27.2 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Atlanta is a culturally diverse hub of history, arts and innovation. Here are some notable places where you can experience the city’s history and culture:

  • Centennial Olympic Park. Atlanta hosted the 1996 Summer Olympics, and Olympic Park, located downtown, pays tribute to the games. Features include an interactive fountain, walking trails and engraved bricks.
  • Georgia Aquarium. Also located downtown, the Georgia Aquarium holds about 500 different species of animals.
  • The World of Coca-Cola. Georgia is home to The Coca-Cola Company, and this museum walks visitors through the history of the company and its titular beverage.
  • National Center for Civil and Human Rights. This museum features exhibits honoring the Civil Rights movement in the United States and makes connections with ongoing human rights issues throughout the world.
The 10 Best Places to Live in Georgia

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e. Education

There are 136 public schools and 468 private schools in the Atlanta area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are 33 public and 46 private schools.

Overall, the Atlanta area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges in the immediate Atlanta area include nationally renowned institutions such as Emory University (ranked #21 in the country by U.S. News and World Report), Georgia Tech, Georgia State University, Spelman College and Morehouse College. Other colleges include Georgia Gwinnett College and Atlanta Technical College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Atlanta was above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was well above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

The Atlanta metro area is served by a number of major hospitals and healthcare centers, including Emory University Hospital’s multiple campuses, Northside Hospital, Grady Hospital and Piedmont Hospital.

Atlanta has 8.28 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, above both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 46.13 property crimes per 1,000 residents, above both Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

While the crime statistics for the overall Atlanta Metro area appear high, they are not dissimilar to other big cities in the United States – such as Miami or Houston – especially for violent crimes per 1,000 residents. As with many of these sprawling cities, Atlanta has plenty of safe and affordable neighborhoods. Overall, the crime rates have been coming down, with almost 85% of the crimes being petty thefts and low level break ins.

3. Kennesaw 

HOMEiA Score: 83/100

  • Population: 33,036 | Rank Last Year: #9
  • Cost of Living: 8% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $194,800/$70,930 = 2.75 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $70,930/$15,240 = 4.65 (renting homes is affordable)

Nestled on the northwestern edge of Kennesaw Mountain, this city is 23 miles northwest of Atlanta and can be accessed by Interstate 75.

a. Size and Population

Kennesaw has a population of 33,036 (2020) spread over a 9.82-square-mile area. The population density is 3,364.2 per square mile.

The population in Kennesaw grew by 10.9% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Kennesaw.

KENNESAW MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $70,930

Kennesaw Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 8% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 1% Lower than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 42% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 1% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Kennesaw Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$194,800 $17,148 $15,240

Kennesaw shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 2.75, based on a median home value of $194,800 and a median household income of $70,930. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is very affordable to buy homes in the Kennesaw area.

Kennesaw shows an income to rent ratio of 4.65, based on a median household income of $70,930 and an annual spend of $15,240. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Kennesaw.

In Kennesaw, 62.7% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Kennesaw, GA:

Kennesaw’s relatively small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Kennesaw range from $250,000 to $750,000, though homes worth more than $800,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Deerfield
    Deerfield is a neighborhood in northern Kennesaw. Nearby Deerfield Park has great walking trails that wind through the subdivisions.
  • Legacy Park
    Legacy Park bills itself as “Atlanta’s First Townpark Community.” Community amenities coexist alongside natural landscapes and trails.
  • Summerbrooke
    Conveniently located near I-75, Summerbrooke has various family-oriented amenities.
  • Nowlin Woods
    Nowlin Woods is a neighborhood in the far northwest corner of Kennesaw. It has easy access to schools, shopping and public transportation.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Kennesaw is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 10.0%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Kennesaw area include AmRest, ENERCON, Markem-Imaje and Kennesaw State University.

The Kennesaw area has an average commute time of 34.2 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

While Kennesaw may be most famous for its mandatory gun ownership law, the city also carries a rich history, beginning with its establishment as “Big Shanty,” a town along the first railroad in Georgia. Here are some highlights:

  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park. The park commemorates a Civil War battlefield and also preserves artifacts from the history of Georgia.
  • Great Locomotive Chase. Kennesaw (then Big Shanty) was the starting point of a Civil War military raid known as the Great Locomotive Chase. A museum marks the spot where the chase began, with the stolen locomotive engine on display.
  • Kennesaw Wi-Fi. On a more modern note, the city of Kennesaw provides free public Wi-Fi with hotspots downtown and in public parks.
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c. Education

There are 16 public schools and 39 private schools in the Kennesaw area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are four public and five private schools.

Overall, the Kennesaw area has a good educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges near the Kennesaw area include Life University, Oglethorpe University, Reinhardt University and Georgia Institute of Technology.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Kennesaw was above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Kennesaw is served by a number of healthcare facilities, including Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Town Center and Kaiser Permanente TownPark Comprehensive Medical Center.

Kennesaw has 1.56 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 16.99 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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4. Suwanee 

HOMEiA Score: 87/100

  • Population: 20,786 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 16% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $308,900/$90,436 = 3.42 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $90,436/$17,856 = 5.06 (renting homes is very affordable)

Located 30 miles north of Atlanta, Suwanee can be accessed by Interstate 85, U.S. Route 23 and State Route 317. The city is characterized by over 600 acres of parkland.

a. Size and Population

Suwanee has a population of 20,786 (2020) spread over a 10.95-square-mile area. The population density is 1,898.3 per square mile.

The population in Suwanee grew by 35.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, significantly above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Suwanee.

SUWANEE MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $90,436

Suwanee Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 16% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 6% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 38% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 8% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Suwanee Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$308,900 $21,060 $17,856

Suwanee shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.42, based on a median home value of $308,900 and a median household income of $90,436. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Suwanee area.

Suwanee shows an income to rent ratio of 5.06, based on a median household income of $90,436 and an annual spend of $17,856. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Suwanee.

In Suwanee, 74.3% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Suwanee, GA:

Suwanee’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Suwanee range from $300,000 to $700,000, though homes worth more than $750,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town

  • Hillside Trace 
    This neighborhood features Craftsman and Traditional style homes and townhomes. It’s also located in one of the best school districts in Suwanee.
  • Aberdeen
    This gated community is characterized by English-inspired names and architectural design. Multiple shopping centers are conveniently located nearby.
  • Turnberry
    Located in northwest Suwanee, this neighborhood features custom homes and close proximity to plenty of businesses, recreational facilities and more.
  • Hawthorne
    Hawthorne prides itself on being a close-knit community. There’s also a lake that’s open for fishing as well as other recreational amenities.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Suwanee is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 6.2%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Suwanee area include Price Industries, Habasit America, Oki Telecom and Smartsoft International.

The Suwanee area has an average commute time of 34.0 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Suwanee’s 600 acres of parks and trails make it a great place to enjoy the outdoors, but its more urban offerings are just as appealing. Here are few of the highlights:

  • Public Art. Suwanee’s SculpTour program has installed permanent works of public art all over the city.
  • Town Center. Suwanee’s Town Center is a mixed-use area that includes a park, trails, a terraced amphitheater and City Hall.
  • Old Town. Suwanee’s historic district is largely residential and includes a historic Main Street with structures dating back as early as 1871.

e. Education

There are 15 public schools and 32 private schools in the Suwanee area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are four public and two private schools.

Overall, the Suwanee area has an excellent educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges near the Suwanee area are the same as those close to Johns Creek and include Gwinnett College, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Piedmont Technical College, Atlanta Technical College and Georgia Gwinnett College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Suwanee was substantially above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was significantly above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Suwanee has a number of hospitals and medical centers, including Gwinnett Medical Center.

Suwanee has 1.87 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 18.8 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

5. Decatur

Decatur, Georgia

HOMEiA Score: 96/100

  • Population: 24,928 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 2% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $521,900/$106,088 = 4.92 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $106,088/$12,180 = 8.71 (renting homes is extremely affordable)

Decatur sits just 5 miles northeast of downtown Atlanta and is actually partially surrounded by Atlanta itself. That places Decatur inside what is known as “the Perimeter” — that is, Interstate 285 — which creates a loop around Atlanta and some of the surrounding suburbs.

It’s important to note that “Decatur” can refer to either the City of Decatur or to a larger area that includes portions of unincorporated Dekalb County. In this article, we will be referring to the City of Decatur.

a. Size and Population

Decatur has a population of 24,928 (2020) spread over a 4.45-square-mile area. The population density is 5,601.8 per square mile.

The population in Decatur grew by 28.9% from April 2010 through April 2020, substantially above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Decatur.

DECATUR MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $106,088

Decatur Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 2% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 7% Lower than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 46% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 5% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Decatur Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$521,900 $32,328 $12,180

Decatur shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 4.92, based on a median home value of $521,900 and a median household income of $106,088. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is expensive to buy homes in the Decatur area.

Decatur shows an income to rent ratio of 8.71, based on a median household income of $106,088 and an annual spend of $12,180. Therefore, it is extremely affordable to rent properties in Decatur.

In Decatur, 62.2% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Decatur, GA:

Decatur’s relatively small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Decatur range from $125,000 to $600,000, though homes worth more than $700,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Oakhurst
    Conveniently located just east of downtown Atlanta, this historic neighborhood has its own business district, known as “Oakhurst Village.” The neighborhood hosts a number of regular festivals and concerts, including free public Jazz Nights during the spring and fall.
  • Winnona Parkx
    Winnona Park is located in the southeast corner of Decatur, south of downtown. It’s known for its historic architecture, including the Avary-Fulton House, which is believed to be the oldest house in all of Decatur. Winnona Park is also home to Columbia Theological Seminary.
  • Clairemont–Great Lakes
    This neighborhood is in the north central part of Decatur and is largely made up of residences and churches.
  • Adair Park
    Adair Park, located in the western part of Decatur, features a wide variety of architecture, from historic to modern. Whatever your taste, you can find a place to settle down in this quiet neighborhood.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Decatur is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 8.4%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in Decatur are governmental and educational systems, including the City of Dekalb, the City of Decatur, Emory University Health Systems and Agnes Scott College.

The Decatur area has an average commute time of 27.3 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Decatur is known for its artistic flair and diversity. Although it was actually established before Atlanta, the city declined to become a railroad stop — and thus the state’s capital — in favor of retaining its small-town feel. Here are some of the diverse offerings you can enjoy:

  • Public art. Decatur is filled to the brim with public art in the form of murals, sculptures, concerts, festivals and more! Public art project #lookupdecatur invites you to hunt for paintings mounted on street poles throughout the city.
  • Historic Districts. Decatur has many historic districts with houses and other structures that are on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Food. Whatever you’re craving, you can find it amid Decatur’s diverse food scene.
  • The Square. The center of downtown Decatur is a pedestrian shopping square built up around the old county courthouse, which is now a museum. It’s a fabulous place to shop, eat, relax and have fun.

c. Education

There are 39 public schools and 126 private schools in the Decatur area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are four public and seven private schools.

Overall, the Decatur area has a good educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges in the immediate Decatur area include Agnes Scott College, DeVry University and Georgia Piedmont Technical College. A bit further out is Emory University, one of the top universities in the United States.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Decatur was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was significantly above the national average of approximately 32%.

d. Healthcare and Safety

Decatur has two primary hospitals, both of which are branches of Decatur Morgan Hospital: Decatur Morgan Hospital’s Decatur Campus and Parkway Campus. There are also a number of private and public healthcare centers and counseling centers.

Decatur has 1.63 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 21.72 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and slightly above the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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6. Peachtree City

Peachtree City

HOMEiA Score: 91/100

  • Population: 38,244 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 16% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $338,900/$101,121 = 3.35 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $101,121/$16,896 = 5.98 (renting homes is very affordable)

Peachtree City is located about 30 miles south of Atlanta. State Routes 74 and 54 both pass through the city, but residents often travel locally by golf cart rather than car. Most of the city’s roads are accompanied by designated golf cart paths, and most households own a golf cart

a. Size and Population

Peachtree City has a population of 38,244 (2020) spread over a 26.5-square-mile area. The population density is 1,443.2 per square mile.

The population in Peachtree City grew by 11.3% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Peachtree City.

PEACHTREE CITY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $101,121

Peachtree City Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 16% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 6% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 38% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 8% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Peachtree City Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$338,900 $24,072 $16,896

Peachtree City shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.35, based on a median home value of $338,900 and a median household income of $101,121. The U.S. average is . Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Peachtree City area.

Peachtree City shows an income to rent ratio of 5.98, based on a median household income of $101,121 and an annual spend of $16,896. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Peachtree City.

In Peachtree City, 74.8 percent of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Peachtree City, GA:

Peachtree City’s relatively small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Peachtree City range from $200,000 to $600,000, though homes worth more than $750,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Aberdeenx
    This neighborhood is centrally located in Peachtree City and sits to the west of Lake Peachtree.class=”table” border=”1″ width=”100%”
  • Braelinn
    Located in the southeast part of the city, Braelinn rests on S Peachtree Parkway. It encompasses shopping areas Braelinn Village Shopping Center and Wilshire Pavilion.
  • Glenloch
    West of Lake Peachtree, Glenloch has its own recreation complex.
  • Kedron
    This neighborhood centers around Lake Kedron in northern Peachtree City. In addition to residential areas, Kedron has two major shopping centers: Kedron Village and Peachtree Crossing.
  • Wilksmoor
    Approved in 2018 to be rezoned into single-family home lots, Wilksmoor is a newly developed residential neighborhood located in the west side of Peachtree City.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Peachtree City is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 5.6%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Peachtree City area include Osmose Utilities Services, Wencore and Hoshizashi America.

The Peachtree City area has an average commute time of 29.4 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Peachtree City’s design places great emphasis on natural beauty. Here are some highlights:

  • Golf cart paths. The city’s maze of golf cart paths allow you to get just about anywhere in the city without a car. Most businesses have designated golf cart parking as well.
  • Lakes. Peachtree City has three major lakes: Lake Peachtree, Lake Kedron, and Lake McIntosh, all of which are water sources for Fayette County. The lakes, as well as a number of ponds, are owned by the city and open to residents and their guests.
  • Golf and Country Clubs. As you might have guessed from all the golf carts, there are a number of country clubs and golf courses in Peachtree City.
  • Line Creek Nature Area. Tucked away in the woods just off Highway 54 is a public nature area where visitors can go hiking and fishing along Line Creek.

e. Education

There are 8 public schools and 9 private schools in the Peachtree City area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there is 1 public and no private school.

Overall, the Peachtree City area has an excellent educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges in the Peachtree City area include Atlanta Metropolitan College, Atlanta Technical College, Bauder College (Atlanta campus), Brenau University (South Atlanta campus) and Clayton State University (Fayette Campus). Emory University in Atlanta is also in the vicinity.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Peachtree City was substantially above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was significantly above the national average of approximately 32%

f. Healthcare and Safety

Peachtree City has a number of medical centers, including Fayette Hospital and Peachtree Medical Center.

Peachtree City has 0.52 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both the Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 12.9 property crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both the Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

7. Woodstock

Woodstock, Georgia

HOMEiA Score: 86/100

  • Population: 35,065 | Rank Last Year: #6
  • Cost of Living: 12% above the U.S. national average.
  • Home price to income ratio: $243,500/$76,191 = 3.20 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $76,191/$16,104 = 4.73 (renting homes is affordable)

Woodstock, located 30 miles north of Atlanta, was an original stop on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. Today, the city is known for its parks and trails, and for being a fast-growing suburb. The city can be accessed by Interstate 575 and State Route 92.

a. Size and Population

Woodstock has a population of 35,065 (2020) spread over a 12.53-square-mile area. The population density is 2,798.5 per square mile.

The population in Woodstock grew by 46.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, significantly above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Woodstock.

WOODSTOCK MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $76,191

Woodstock Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 12% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 2% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 40% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 4% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Woodstock Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$243,500 $19,260 $16,104

 

Woodstock shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.20, based on a median home value of $243,500 and a median household income of $76,191. The U.S. average is 3.46. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Woodstock area.

Woodstock shows an income to rent ratio of 4.73, based on a median household income of $76,191 and an annual spend of $16,104. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Woodstock.

In Woodstock, 64.5 percent of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Woodstock, GA:

The best neighborhoods to live in Woodstock include the ones listed below.

  • Towne Lake (Average Home Value $300,000 to $550,000+)
    Just west of downtown Woodstock, Towne Lake is home to public parks and creeks. Once part of a wildlife management area, it’s now a busy commercial and residential area.
  • Brookshire (Average Home Value $275,000 to $450,000)
    Brookshire is a residential community located near Towne Lake. Residents enjoy exclusive access to various recreational amenities and clubhouses.
  • Wyngate (Average Home Value $350,000 to $450,000)
    Also near Towne Lake, Wyngate homes are mostly large, single-family residences.
  • Woodlands (Average Home Value $350,000 to $450,000)
    Located along Woodland Parkway, Woodlands features more than 1,000 single-family homes as well as townhomes. Its streets are lined with trees and multi-use trails.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Woodstock is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 7.7%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Woodstock area are mostly local and include companies such as Marizyme, Combined Investigators, ComponentSource and Cherokee Ford.

The Woodstock area has an average commute time of 35.9 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Woodstock got its start as a mining and agricultural area, and it retains its attachment to nature and history. Here a few highlights:

  • The Greenprints Project. Through this initiative, the city of Woodstock has constructed a network of parks, trails, and open space to preserve the surrounding green spaces.
  • Historic Downtown. Enjoy the historic architecture while you browse local shops and restaurants.
  • Olde Rope Mill Park. Once a cotton mill for ropes, this area is now a park with trails, river activities such as fishing and canoeing, and more.

e. Education

There are 14 public schools and 36 private schools in the Woodstock area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there 3 public and 2 private schools.

Overall, the Woodstock area has a good educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges near the Woodstock area include Reinhardt University and Lincoln College of Technology.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Woodstock was substantially above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was well above the national average of approximately 32%

f. Healthcare and Safety

Woodstock is served by a number of hospitals and health centers, including WellStar Kennestone Hospital and Piedmont Physicians of Towne Lake.

Woodstock has 1.18 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both the Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 13.26 property crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both the Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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8. Sandy Springs

Sandy Springs

HOMEiA Score: 84/100

  • Population: 108,080 | Rank Last Year: #8
  • Cost of Living: 34% above the U.S. national average.
  • Home price to income ratio: $471,800/$78,613 = 6.00 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $78,613/$15,924 = 4.94 (renting homes is affordable)

The city of Sandy Springs borders Atlanta on the northern side, right on the edge of “The Perimeter” of I-285. It can also be accessed by State Route 400. Its proximity to Atlanta makes it a great place to experience both the attractions of the big city and the peacefulness of a smaller town.

a. Size and Population

Sandy Springs has a population of 108,080 (2020) spread over a 38.52-square-mile area. The population density is 2,805.8 per square mile.

The population in Sandy Springs grew by 15.2% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Sandy Springs.

SANDY SPRINGS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $78,613

Sandy Springs Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 34% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 22% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 29% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 25% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Sandy Springs Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$471,800 $28,992 $15,924

Sandy Springs shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 6.00, based on a median home value of $471,800 and a median household income of $78,613. The U.S. average is 3.46. Therefore, it is expensive to buy homes in the Sandy Springs area.

Sandy Springs shows an income to rent ratio of 4.94, based on a median household income of $78,613 and an annual spend of $15,924. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Sandy Springs.

In Sandy Springs, 47.9 percent of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Sandy Springs, GA:

The best neighborhoods to live in Sandy Springs include the ones listed below:

  • North Springs (Average Home Value: $200,000 to $600,000+)
    Located in the northeast of Sandy Springs, this neighborhood is full of green spaces and is a great place to walk your dog. Public transit is easily accessible.
  • Riverside (Average Home Value: $500,000 to $1+ million)
    Riverside is so named because it rests along the Chattahoochee River. The community has easy access to outdoor activities and exploration, as well as close proximity to a number of notable schools, both public and private.
  • South Springs (Average Home Value: $225,000 to $500,000+)
  • Also known as Sandy Springs ITP (Inside the Perimeter), this neighborhood is located in the south part of Sandy Springs and within the major Atlanta-area highway loop. Downtown (Average Home Value: $150,000 to $600,000).
    The city center of Sandy Springs is a mixed-use area with access to all of the city’s main attractions. Recent renovations have created a bustling hub for shopping, eating, entertainment and more.
  • North End (Average Home Value: $200,000 to $700,000+)
    The northernmost part of Sandy Springs is located just south of the Chattahoochee River and west of State Route 400. It encompasses several communities and business districts, and much of the area has been undergoing redevelopment to add more green space and shopping centers.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Sandy Springs is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 7.6%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Sandy Springs area include several headquarters for Fortune 500 companies, such as UPS, Westrock, Newell Brands, Ventiv, Intercontinental Exchange, Graphic Packaging Holdings, Mercedes-Benz USA, Cox Communications, BMC and Global Payments.

The Sandy Springs area has an average commute time of 26.1 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

With so many corporate headquarters in the area, Sandy Springs is known as a business hub. Here are some other points of interest:

  • Annual Festivals. The city of Sandy Springs hosts many festivals and events throughout the year. Some noteworthy examples include the Sandy Springs Festival, Artsapalooza Arts Festival and the Chattahoochee River Summer Splash.
  • City Springs. The downtown shopping center has fun and entertainment for everyone, from the City Green to the Sandy Springs Performing Arts Center to a wide selection of restaurants.
  • Morgan Falls Overlook Park. If you’re looking for outdoor adventures, this park has everything you need. And your dog is welcome, too!
  • Heritage Sandy Springs Museum and Park. Here you’ll find the city’s namesake springs, as well as entertainment venues and the Williams-Payne House, a museum showcasing the history of Sandy Springs.

e. Education

There are two private schools and one public school in the Sandy Springs area, based on data from GreatSchools. There is one private high school and no public high schools.

Overall, the Sandy Springs area has a good educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges near the Sandy Springs area include Georgia State, Atlanta Technical College, Gwinnett Technical College, Georgia Piedmont Technical College and Chattahoochee Technical College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Sandy Springs was well above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was more than double the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Sandy Springs is home to more major healthcare centers than any other city in Metro Atlanta. The three chief hospitals are Northside Hospital, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

Sandy Springs has 1.31 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 18.2 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

9. Johns Creek

Johns Creek

HOMEiA Score: 95/100

  • Population: 82,453 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 30% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $400,100/$122,514 = 3.27 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $122,514/$12,744 = 9.61 (renting homes is extremely affordable)

Johns Creek is located about 25 miles northeast of Atlanta. State Routes 120, 141 and 140 pass through the city. Johns Creek is characterized by a number of nature and heritage sites.

a. Size and Population

Johns Creek has a population of 82,453 (2020) spread over a 31.34-square-mile area. The population density is 2,630.9 per square mile.

The population in Johns Creek grew by 7.5% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% but below the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Johns Creek.

JOHNS CREEK MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $122,514

Johns Creek Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 30% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 18% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 31% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 21% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Johns Creek Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$400,100 $26,664 $12,744

Johns Creek shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.27, based on a median home value of $400,100 and a median household income of $122,514. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Johns Creek area.

Johns Creek shows an income to rent ratio of 9.61, based on a median household income of $122,514 and an annual spend of $12,744. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Johns Creek.

In Johns Creek, 76.4% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Johns Creek, GA:

Johns Creek’s relatively small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Johns Creek range from $250,000 to $900,000, though homes worth more than $1 million are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town

  • Medlock Bridge
    On the east side of Johns Creek, Medlock Bridge is one of the biggest neighborhoods in town. With plenty of community amenities and events, there’s no shortage of ways to enjoy the area.
  • Abberley Towneship
    This gated community of single-family homes and townhomes is located in the northwestern part of Johns Creek. Residents enjoy various amenities, including clubhouses, recreational facilities and more.
  • Rivermont
    This neighborhood was designed to contain various smaller neighborhoods, each with its own unique style of residences.
  • Doublegate
    Located in the western part of Johns Creek, Doublegate is a community that’s conveniently located for all your shopping and commuting needs.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Johns Creek is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 3.9%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Johns Creek area include Alcon Laboratories, Macy’s Systems and Technologies, State Farm Insurance and Emory Johns Creek Hospitals.

The Johns Creek area has an average commute time of 33.5 minutes.

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d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Johns Creek wasn’t actually a city until 2006. Prior to this, the land was owned by graduates from Georgia Tech who built their own technology park to echo the one in Atlanta. Today, Johns Creek is still a center for business, with a high concentration of restaurants and 200 different companies. Here are a few other points of interest:

  • Main Crossroad Communities. The original Crossroad Communities of Ocee, Newtown, Shakerag and Warsaw were the major points of business in Johns Creek prior to its establishment as a city. These four names are still in use on various businesses and public facilities.
  • Audrey Mill Nature Preserve and Heritage Center. Visitors to the park can take cell phone tours to learn about the history and wildlife of the area or explore the trails and Heritage Village.
  • The Johns Creek Tunnel. This pedestrian tunnel under Medlock Bridge Road features a tunnel-long mural celebrating the linguistic and cultural diversity of the Johns Creek community.

e. Education

There are two public schools and nine private schools in the Johns Creek area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are two private schools and one public school.

Overall, the Johns Creek area has an excellent educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges near the Johns Creek area include Gwinnett College, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Piedmont Technical College, Atlanta Technical College and Georgia Gwinnett College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Johns Creek was substantially above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was more than double the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Johns Creek is served by Emory Johns Creek Hospital as well as other healthcare centers.

Johns Creek has 0.58 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 6.21 property crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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10. Canton

Canton Georgia

HOMEiA Score: 80/100

  • Population: 32,973 | Rank Last Year: #10
  • Cost of Living: 15% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $215,600/$61,259 =3.52 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $61,259/$13,692 = 4.47 (renting homes is affordable)

Canton sits 40 miles north of Atlanta, accessible by Interstate 575 and State Routes 20 and 140. The beautiful Etowah River flows directly through the city center.

a. Size and Population

Canton has a population of 32,973 (2020) spread over an 18.85-square-mile area. The population density is 1,749.2 per square mile.

The population in Canton grew by 43.6% from April 2010 through April 2020, significantly above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Canton.

CANTON MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $61,259

Canton Cost of Living, Georgia.

  • 15% Higher than the U.S. National Average
  • 5% Higher than Atlanta, Georgia
  • 39% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 8% Higher than Chicago, Illinois

Canton Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$215,600 $17,352 $13,692

Canton shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.52, based on a median home value of $215,600 and a median household income of $61,259. The U.S. average is 4.00. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Canton area.

Canton shows an income to rent ratio of 4.47, based on a median household income of $61,259 and an annual spend of $13,692. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Canton.

In Canton, 49.7% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Canton, GA:

The best neighborhoods to live in Canton include the following:

  • River Green (Average Home Value: $275,000 to $600,000)
    So named for its location on the Etowah River, River Green is nestled in the woods and features walking trails, a lake and more.
  • Towne Mill (Average Home Value: $400,000 to 500,000+)
    Located in the north of Canton, Towne Mill is a neighborhood with a number of gated communities and residential areas.
  • BridgeMill (Average Home Value: $275,000 to $700,000+)
    BridgeMill is a neighborhood in south Canton. Its nearly 3,000 residences vary in style, and the community boasts over 150 acres of green space.
  • Great Sky (Average Home Value: $375,000 to $600,000)
    Located in the northernmost part of Canton, Great Sky lives up to its name with breathtaking views of the mountain scenery.

c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Canton is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%. The poverty rate, at 17.9%, is above both the national average of 10.5% and the Georgia average of 13.3%.

The top employers in the Canton area include Universal Alloy and Piolax on the private sector side and Cherokee County and Cherokee High School on the local government side.

The Canton area has an average commute time of 34.2 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

More than half of Canton’s structures were destroyed during the Civil War, but today the city is growing and developing rapidly. Here are a few points of interest:

  • Etowah River Park. This is a great place to take in the beautiful scenery while walking, running or just sitting on a bench.
  • Canton Theatre. The theater first opened over 100 years ago and has operated on and off ever since. Today, it’s still in use for plays, concerts and more.
  • Canton Farmers Market. Your stop for locally grown produce as well as locally made crafts, chocolate and much, much more.

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c. Education

There are 20 public schools and 27 private schools in the Canton area, based on data from GreatSchools. Among high schools, there are four public and two private schools.

Overall, the Canton area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The universities and colleges near the Canton area include Chattahoochee Technical College and Reinhardt University.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Canton was just below the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was below the national average of approximately 32%.

d. Healthcare and Safety

Cherokee County has ranked as Georgia’s third-healthiest county. Canton is served by Northside Hospital Cherokee as well as other medical centers.

Canton has 1.28 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, significantly below both Georgia’s statewide median rate of 3.41 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 21.46 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below Georgia’s statewide median of 23.76 and just above the U.S. national median of 21.00.

CONCLUSION

While Georgia is certainly a good place to relax under a shade tree with a glass of sweet tea, it’s also a melting pot of diverse culture and art. Whichever city you choose to settle down in, you’ll find plenty of neighbors all around ready to welcome you home.

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I’m an avid writer who often focuses on real estate, business consulting, economics and finance. Before leading business and investment advisory services for over 25 years, I got a Ph.D. in Economics and taught at the university level. I have lived in Houston, Texas and Chicago, Illinois for a combined 35 years. I also traveled to 40+ states on business and pleasure, and love writing about the great cities and small towns across the US. Read more >>
Kristine Pike is a writer and podcast assistant with a passion for storytelling, organization, and communication. She worked as an ESL teacher in Hubei, China for four years before moving back home to Georgia, and though she no longer teaches, she still makes it her business to empower others in getting their message into the right words and out to those who need to hear it. Kristine is always on the lookout for new places and creative avenues to explore. Read more >>