10 Best Places to Live in Wyoming 2021

Wyoming is known for its big skies, open prairies and cowboy boots — yet it’s more than that. It reminds you that open space matters. In Wyoming, space is allotted for what’s essential, and the rest is left open for all to enjoy. It’s a place where you can relax, breathe in and breathe out.

There’s a deep pride in the Old West — in its pioneer and Native American culture — making Wyoming a state with deep, strong roots that have yet to break. Wyoming’s statehood came about largely thanks to the railroad, which brought in hard workers who wanted space of their own. You can have your own space here, too; there’s still plenty to go around.

Some Common Factors

All of the communities described here have certain characteristics in common. Here are a few:

  1. 1. Taxes. Wyoming is one of the most tax-friendly states in the country. It has no state income tax, while the national average state income tax is 4.6%. The combined state and local sales tax rate ranges from 4.0% to 6.0%, below the national average of 6.2%. Wyoming also has one of the lowest effective property tax rates in the U.S. at 0.57%.
  2. 2. Climate. Most of Wyoming is at a higher elevation, so the climate tends to be cool and temperate. We will mention any specific climatic anomalies for specific areas if they exist.

For each community below, we assign a HOMEiA Score, which provides an overall assessment of its safety and appeal as a place to call home.

1. Cheyenne

HOMEiA Score: 91/100

  • Population: 65,132 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: <1% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $214,300/$64,598 = 3.32 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $64,598/$10,980 = 5.88 (renting homes is affordable)

Cheyenne is in the southeastern corner of Wyoming, about 20 minutes from the Colorado border. Interstates 25 and 80 both run right through Cheyenne. It’s surrounded by open plains and features a gold-domed capitol building.

a. History, Size and Population

Cheyenne has a population of 65,132 (2020) spread over a 32.37-square-mile area. The population density is 2,012.1 per square mile.

The population in Cheyenne grew by 9.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Cheyenne.

CHEYENNE MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $64,598

Cheyenne Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • <1% Lower than the U.S. National Average
  • 4% Higher than Laramie, Wyoming
  • 46% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 7% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Cheyenne Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$214,300 $17,280 $10,980

Cheyenne shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.32, based on a median home value of $214,300 and a median household income of $64,598. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Cheyenne area.

Cheyenne shows an income to rent ratio of 5.88, based on a median household income of $64,598 and an annual spend of $10,980. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Cheyenne.

In Cheyenne, 65.9% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Cheyenne, WY:

The best neighborhoods to live in Cheyenne include the following:

  • Historic Downtown (Average Home Value $200,000 to $375,000)
    This area is great if you love the Wyoming cowboy culture. There are plenty of museums and old buildings to admire, all within walking distance from each other. This neighborhood consists mostly of single-family homes; however, if you look close enough, you can find landlords renting out multi-level homes that have been split into cute little apartments.
  • Pershing Heights (Average Home Value $250,000 to $400,000)
    This neighborhood, just slightly north-northeast of the historic downtown, mostly consists of single-family homes. The closest schools to the neighborhood — Cheyenne East High School and Carey Junior High — are located just down Pershing Boulevard, the main street in the area.
  • Indian Hills (Average Home Value $250,000 to $500,000)
    This neighborhood is in the northwest part of town, close to the main shopping strip, Del Range Boulevard. The Greenway, a major local walking and biking trail, runs through Myler Park and connects the area to surrounding neighborhoods.
  • South Cheyenne (Average Home Value $200,000 to $500,000)
    South Cheyenne is located south of the historic downtown, on the opposite side of the main thoroughfare, Lincolnway. This neighborhood is very close to Laramie County Community College.
  • Saddle Ridge (Average Home Value $325,000 to $1+ million)
    This neighborhood is on the east side of town. It isn’t far from the shopping centers and businesses in town, but it offers larger lot sizes, so you can really spread out.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Cheyenne is 5.3% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 10.4%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Cheyenne area include the F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Laramie County School District #1, United Medical Centers and Union Pacific Railroad.

The Cheyenne area has an average commute time of 14.3 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Cheyenne is the state’s capital and one of only 10 states with a gold-domed capitol building, so you know your time here will be golden. Here are some facts about the fun you can have:

  • Greenway Trail. With 39 miles to walk or bike, this trail connects many of Cheyenne’s neighborhoods, schools and parks.
  • Cheyenne Frontier Days. Held the last week of every July, this is rodeo is known as “The Daddy of ’Em All.” There’s not only a traditional rodeo, but also concerts each night, fair food, local-made goods to shop for and rides, too.
  • Cheyenne Big Boots. Scattered around the city are 19 cowboy boots on which local artists have painted their Wyoming stories. Find them all.
  • Cheyenne Botanic Gardens. Located in Lions Park, close to the historic downtown, these gardens contain plants from around the world. The building was recently updated and expanded; check out the new conservatory.

 
e. Education

There are 39 public schools and 191 private schools in the Cheyenne area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there eight public and six private schools.

Overall, the Cheyenne area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

Colleges and universities close to Cheyenne include the University of Wyoming in Laramie and Laramie County Community College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Cheyenne was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was just below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Cheyenne Regional Medical Center, Cheyenne’s first hospital, was set up in 1867 to serve the workers on the railroad. Since then it has grown a lot, and it now offers cancer treatments, orthopedics, women’s and children’s services, homecare and many other areas of healthcare.

Cheyenne has 3.42 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, above Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and below the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 31.12 property crimes per 1,000 residents, above Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

2. Sheridan

HOMEiA Score: 91/100

  • Population: 18,737 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 3% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $228,200/$54,278 = 4.20 (buying homes is slightly expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $54,278/$9,852 = 5.51 (renting homes is affordable)

Halfway between Yellowstone National Park and Mount Rushmore is Sheridan, Wyoming. Sheridan grew up around the Burlington and Missouri Railroads, which brought in a population that worked on the railroad for a living. They also created the famous Sheridan Inn, which is still standing. Sheridan is near the center of the northern border of the state. The main point of access by air is Sheridan County airport, which has a daily jet service to and from Denver.

a. History, Size and Population

Sheridan has a population of 18,737 (2020) spread over a 12.71-square-mile area. The population density is 1,474.2 per square mile.

The population in Sheridan grew by 7.2% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Sheridan.

SHERIDAN MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $54,278

Sheridan Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 3% Below the U.S. National Average
  • 5% Lower than Gillette, Wyoming
  • 48% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 9% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Sheridan Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$228,200 $15,684 $9,852

Sheridan shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 4.20, based on a median home value of $228,200 and a median household income of $54,278. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is slightly expensive to buy homes in the Sheridan area.

Sheridan shows an income to rent ratio of 5.51, based on a median household income of $54,278 and an annual spend of $9,852. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Sheridan.

In Sheridan, 59.7% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Sheridan, WY:

Sheridan’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Sheridan range from $75,000 to $700,000, though homes worth more than $1 million are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Coffeen Ave./Sixth Ave. East 
    This is where Sheridan College resides. Nearby is Story Penrose Trail, where you can hike and take in the scenery. Just a short drive north and you’ll find a couple of coffee shops.
  • Central Sheridan
    This is where you’ll find a nice little smattering of places to eat and bars, too. North Main St. goes through the middle of town, and that’s where you’ll find Smith Alley Brewing Company. Stop in for a burger or sandwich.
  • West Sheridan
    You’ll find Sheridan Memorial Hospital here, as well as the Sheridan County Fairgrounds. The fair is mostly focused on the youth 4H and FFA programs, but anyone can join the fun.
  • East Sheridan
    Close to Interstate 90 and Bighorn National Forest, you’ll find this quiet part of town rural and beautiful — yet it’s close enough to the center of town to not feel too isolated. It’s also a short distance to a nice nature walk through the forest.
  • North Sheridan
    Goose Creek runs nearby, as does the railroad. If you enjoy watching the trains, stop at Big Horn Beverage Company, which sits close to the tracks.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Sheridan is 5.4% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 6.8%, is substantially below the national average of 10.5% and below the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Sheridan area include Sheridan County School District #2, Sheridan VA Healthcare System, Memorial Hospital of Sheridan County, BNSF Railway and Cloud Peak Energy.

The Sheridan area has an average commute time of 12.1 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Sheridan has a rich history and beautiful outdoor spaces. Here are some important things to know about this town:

  • Fine Art. Sheridan has at least 15 different galleries filled with western-inspired art from both international and local artists.
  • Cattle. Sheridan became what it is today in part through cattle ranching. It’s still a big part of the town’s culture today. If you’ve never seen a ranch, this is your chance.
  • Big Horn National Forest. West of town, this forest is the place to go if you love hiking, sight-seeing, wildlife or even fishing and hunting.
  • Story Fish Hatchery. Check out the visitor center and see where all the fish in Wyoming’s public lakes are bred and raised. The extra fish get traded with other states for fish that are uncommon here.

 
e. Education

There are 10 public schools and 40 private schools in the Sheridan area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are three public schools and one private school.

Overall, the Sheridan area is known for an excellent educational infrastructure, ahead of the average for similarly sized metro areas.

Sheridan College is the closest postsecondary school.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Sheridan was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was just below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Sheridan is home to Sheridan Memorial Hospital, located in the northwest part of town. Sheridan also has a variety of clinics and specialty facilities available, such as heart centers, family practices, walk-in clinics and more.

Sheridan has 0.50 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, substantially below Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and below the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 20.57 property crimes per 1,000 residents, above Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 but below the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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3. Cody

HOMEiA Score: 88/100

  • Population: 10,028 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 5% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $236,900/$60,404 = 3.92 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $60,404/$10,980 = 5.50 (renting homes is affordable)

Cody can be found in the northwest part of the state, slightly east of Buffalo Bill State Park, where you can visit the Buffalo Bill Dam. Yellowstone Regional Airport is located here; it offers year-round service to and from Denver as well as seasonal trips to Salt Lake City.

a. History, Size and Population

Cody has a population of 10,028 (2020) spread over a 10.46-square-mile area. The population density is 958.7 per square mile.

The population in Cody grew by 5.3% from April 2010 through April 2020, below the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% but above the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Cody.

CODY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $60,404

Cody Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 5% Above the U.S. National Average
  • 7% Higher than Sheridan, Wyoming
  • 44% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 2% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Cody Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$236,900 $16,248 $10,980

Cody shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.92, based on a median home value of $236,900 and a median household income of $60,404. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Cody area.

Cody shows an income to rent ratio of 5.50, based on a median household income of $60,404 and an annual spend of $10,980. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Cody.

In Cody, 64.1% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Cody, WY:

Cody’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Cody range from $200,000 to $1.25 million, though homes worth more than $1.5 million are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Southwest Cody
    This is a more rural part of town; however, it has the stadium for the Cody Night Rodeo. That’s right; the rodeos don’t start until sundown. They run here from June to September.
  • East Cody
    You can find Yellowstone Regional Airport here. It is made up of mostly single-family homes, and it’s close enough to the main roads to do your shopping. There are a few parks to stroll through.
  • Central Cody
    Cody High School resides here. Not only is this neighborhood nicely close to the school, but it’s also close to all your necessities.
  • North Cody
    This is a beautiful spot in town to see the Shoshone River before it hits the dam at Buffalo Bill Reservoir. There’s a highly rated RV park here, too, if you’re looking for a temporary place to stay.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Cody is 5.2% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 6.7%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Cody area include the University of Wyoming, the U.S. Air Force, Microsoft Corporation and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

The Cody area has an average commute time of 13.4 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Cody was named after its founder, Colonel William Fredrick “Buffalo Bill” Cody, back in 1896. Today, you may recognize Cody as the rather new home of rapper Kanye West. The mountains to the west of town provide beautiful scenery and many recreational opportunities. Here are a few highlights:

  • Old Trail Town. See frontier buildings from the 1890s at this popular historic site, open from May to September. The historic buildings were brought in from across Wyoming and Montana to produce an authentic Old West experience.
  • Yellowstone National Park. Named the first national park in the world, you’ll find so much beauty here; the wildlife, the mountains and even the clean air are worth the trip.
  • Scenic Byways. These roads take you through the most scenic areas around Cody. Take a day to drive one, and you’ll see tons of wildlife and views of the mountains you thought were only possible in pictures.
  • Sleeping Giant Ski Area. You can ski, snowboard, snowshoe or take lessons in any of them.

Winter here can be dangerous if you’re not careful, but with the right knowledge, the views and the sports make Cody a place to be all year round.
 
e. Education

There are eight public schools and 23 private schools in the Cody area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are two public schools and one private school.

Overall, the Cody area is known for an excellent educational infrastructure, ahead of the average for similarly sized metro areas.

Colleges and universities close to Cody include Northwest College-Cody Center and the University of Wyoming’s Research-Extension Center.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Cody was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Cody’s medical facilities include West Park Hospital and several specialty clinics in the area.

Cody has 1.74 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 10.93 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

4. Casper

HOMEiA Score: 89/100

  • Population: 59,038 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 5% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $207,400/$61,979 = 3.35 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $61,979/$10,212 = 6.07 (renting homes is very affordable)

Casper, located in central Wyoming, has a lovely mountain backdrop and a sky that goes on for days. Follow Interstate 25 north from Cheyenne or south from Sheridan and you’ll eventually hit Casper. The North Platte River runs through Casper, and you can see it up close at North Platte Park.

a. History, Size and Population

Casper has a population of 59,038 (2020) spread over a 26.88-square-mile area. The population density is 2,196.4 per square mile.

The population in Casper grew by 6.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Casper.

CASPER MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $61,979

Casper Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 5% Below the U.S. National Average
  • 7% Lower than Gillette, Wyoming
  • 49% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 11% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Casper Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$207,400 $16,356 $10,212

Casper shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.35, based on a median home value of $207,400 and a median household income of $61,979. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Casper area.

Casper shows an income to rent ratio of 6.07, based on a median household income of $61,979 and an annual spend of $10,212. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Casper.

In Casper, 64.4% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Casper, WY:

Casper’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Casper range from $125,000 to $1 million, though homes worth more than $2 million are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • North Casper
    You’ll find a couple of elementary schools here with mostly single-family homes and a few apartment complexes. This neighborhood is close to softball, baseball and soccer fields.
  • West Casper
    The west side of town has a little more rural feel to it. There’s a nice golf club off the river. The Central Wyoming Fairgrounds is just south of the river; Casper holds gun shows and flea markets there during the colder months.
  • South Casper
    This is where Casper College is located. Housing in the area includes single-family homes split into apartments, a popular choice for students.
  • Central Casper
    This is where you’ll be close to all the coffee shops, galleries and family-owned restaurants. The library is close by, and this is where you can find Natrona County High School.
  • East Casper
    This is where you may do most of your shopping. The Eastridge Mall is here, along with a smattering of other well-known stores and restaurants. Kelly Walsh High School is located in this part of town.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Casper is 5.2% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 10.0%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Casper area include Natrona County School District #1, Wyoming Medical Center, Key Energy and The Industrial Company (TIC).

The Casper area has an average commute time of 15.9 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Casper is the second largest city in Wyoming and is the only city in the state to have escalators: two, to be precise. Places to visit in Casper include:

  • Casper Mountain County Park. There are plenty of trails here; you can bike, go horseback riding and even camp.
  • Casper Disc Golf Course. This is an 18-hole course with roaming wildlife and breathtaking scenery. You’ll also find a view of the city.
  • Nicolaysen Art Museum. Not only does The Nic have contemporary and traditional western art, but they also have lessons for every age. You can host birthday parties here, too.
  • Casper Events Center. This place has events going year-round, from bull fighting to concerts to musicals to kids’ fests. You’ll find something you want to see.

 
e. Education

There are 30 public schools and 118 private schools in the Casper area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there four public and no private schools.

Overall, the Casper area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

Colleges and universities in Casper include the University of Wyoming at Casper and Casper College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Casper was above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Casper has about four hospitals and several specialty clinics. The most prominent facilities include two Wyoming Medical Center campuses.

Casper has 2.92 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, above Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and below the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 28.95 property crimes per 1,000 residents, above both Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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5. Laramie

HOMEiA Score: 80/100

  • Population: 31,407 | Rank Last Year: #10
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $216,300/$46,117 = 4.69 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $46,117/$9,564 = 4.82 (renting homes is affordable)

Close to the Medicine Bow Mountains you’ll find the city of Laramie — home of the University of Wyoming, the only university in the state. From Cheyenne, head west on Interstate 80 and you’ll see the small city surrounded by mountains.

a. History, Size and Population

Laramie has a population of 31,407 (2020) spread over a 13.38-square-mile area. The population density is 2,347.3 per square mile.

The population in Laramie grew by 1.9% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Laramie.

LARAMIE MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $46,117

Laramie Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 4% Lower than the U.S. National Average
  • 4% Lower than Cheyenne, Wyoming
  • 49% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 10% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Laramie Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$216,300 $18,240 $9,564

Laramie shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 4.69, based on a median home value of $216,300 and a median household income of $46,117. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is expensive to buy homes in the Laramie area.

Laramie shows an income to rent ratio of 4.82, based on a median household income of $46,117 and an annual spend of $9,564. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Laramie.

In Laramie, 45.3% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Laramie, WY:

Laramie’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Laramie range from $150,000 to $500,000, though homes worth more than $750,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Downtown Laramie
    This is where you’ll do most of your shopping. It’s a college town, and this is where the fun is. With cute coffee shops and local breweries, you’ll always find somewhere to go.
  • West Laramie
    A more rural part of town, this area has mostly single-family homes. WyoTech, a trade school, is here. Even farther west is the Laramie Regional Airport.
  • City Center/UW
    UW is here, so there are plenty of apartments and student living areas on this side of town.
  • North Laramie
    This side of town can be rather rural, too, but it isn’t too far a drive from the main strip, where most of the fun is.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Laramie is 5.2% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 23.9%, is above the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Laramie area include the University of Wyoming, the U.S. Army, Sierra Nevada Corporation, Centura Health and Aerotek.

The Laramie area has an average commute time of 11.9 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Laramie was named after a French trapper, Jacques LaRamie, who disappeared in the Laramie Mountains and was never heard from again. Today Laramie is known for the University of Wyoming.

  • History When the Union Pacific Railroad reached Laramie in 1868, the city didn’t have much of a government. Instead, it was run by outlaws who were rather violent — that is, until a vigilante committee was formed by the townsfolk to counter the outlaws.
  • Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historical Site Take a self-guided tour through these cells and you can’t help but feel a shiver down your spine.
  • University of Wyoming. The state’s only university provides the closest you can get to big sporting events in Wyoming. If sports aren’t your thing, the school has museums, too.
  • Laramie Mural Project Local artists and the UW Art Museum have painted murals around downtown Laramie. Maps are available at the Tourism Board so you don’t miss any.

 
e. Education

There are 14 public schools and 48 private schools in the Laramie area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are three public and five private schools.

Overall, the Laramie area is known to have a good educational infrastructure, ahead of the average for similarly sized metro areas.

Laramie is home to the University of Wyoming, Laramie County Community College, and WyoTech.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Laramie was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was also significantly above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Ivinson Memorial Hospital is the main hospital in Laramie, and there are also several medical clinics.

Laramie has 1.86 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 12.08 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

6. Lander

Lander Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 82/100

  • Population: 7,546 | Rank Last Year: #8
  • Cost of Living: 2% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $215,900/$57,799 = 3.74 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $57,799/$10,740 = 5.38 (renting homes is affordable)

Just south of Sacagawea’s gravesite and Wind River Indian Reservation is the beautiful small town of Lander. If you’re travelling on Highway 287, you’ll go right through the middle of town, where you can find a place to grab a bite and also visit a few museums where you can learn about the West.

a. History, Size and Population

Lander has a population of 7,546 (2020) spread over a 9.38-square-mile area. The population density is 804.5 per square mile.

The population in Lander reduced by 0.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, where the overall U.S. population rose by 6.3% and the Wyoming population rose by 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Lander.

LANDER MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $57,779

Lander Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 2% Below the U.S. National Average
  • 2% Higher than Rock Springs, Wyoming
  • 48% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 8% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Lander Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$215,900 $16,416 $10,740

Lander shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.74, based on a median home value of $215,900 and a median household income of $57,779. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Lander area.

Lander shows an income to rent ratio of 5.38, based on a median household income of $57,779 and an annual spend of $10,740. Therefore, it is affordable to rent properties in Lander.

In Lander, 67.1% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Lander, WY:

Lander’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Lander range from $100,000 to $750,000, though homes worth more than $800,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Northside
    You’ll find mostly single-family homes here, and you’ll be close to Lander Middle School and Lander Valley High School. If you’ve got a pup, check out the Lander Dog Park.
  • Central Lander
    You’ll be close to the main road, where you’ll find all of your shopping opportunities. It’s also a short drive or a nice walk to the public swimming pool.
  • Eastside
    This is where you’ll find Central Wyoming College. It’s located in a more rural part of town, but it only takes about 15 minutes to get there from anywhere in Lander.
  • Southwest
    This part of Lander is mostly single-family homes. If you’re looking for even more space between you and your neighbors, you can head out a bit further and find plenty of large lots.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Lander is 5.2% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 8.4%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Lander area include Conoco Philips, the U.S. Army, the U.S. Department of the Interior, AMN Healthcare and the National Outdoor Leadership School.

The Lander area has an average commute time of 14.3 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Lander has a prominent Native American and pioneer background, and you can see this all throughout town. Here are a few places to visit in the area:

  • Wind River Mountains. Lander is about 100 miles from here. This range, which is part of the famous Rocky Mountains, includes Wyoming’s tallest peak, Gannett Peak. There are plenty of trails to hike and you can rock climb, too.
  • Museum of the American West. During the summer months, this museum features performances by Northern Arapahoe and Eastern Shoshone dancers from the Wind River Indian Reservation north of Lander.
  • Wind River Wild Horse Sanctuary. You’ll see wild mustangs up close at this sanctuary north of town. Learn about the important relationship between the horses and the Native Americans who have lived here.
  • Continental Divide Dog Sled Adventures. Ever wanted to ride a sled pulled by dogs? Here’s your chance. These tours start in November and continue until the end of March.

 
e. Education

There are eight public schools and 19 private schools in the Lander area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are three public and no private schools.

Overall, the Lander area has an average educational infrastructure, comparable to similarly sized metro areas.

Nearby colleges and universities include Wyoming Catholic College in Lander and Central Wyoming College in neighboring Riverton.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Lander was above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was also above the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

SageWest Lander is the hospital in town, and there are a couple of medical clinics.

Lander has 2.01 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 36.20 property crimes per 1,000 residents, above both Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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7. Powell

Powell Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 81/100

  • Population: 6,419 | Rank Last Year: #9
  • Cost of Living: 1% below the U.S. national average.
  • Home price to income ratio: $191,000/$56,875 = 3.36 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $56,875/$9,840 = 5.78 (renting homes is very affordable)

Powell is only about 25 miles north of Cody, and a great place for those with an adventurous outdoor spirit. Surrounded by mountains, you’ll find this to be a home for hunters, hikers, artists and more.

a. History, Size and Population

Powell has a population of 6,419 (2020) spread over a 4.29-square-mile area. The population density is 1,496.3 per square mile.

The population in Powell grew by 1.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Powell.

POWELL MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $56,875

Powell Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 1% Below the U.S. National Average
  • 2% Higher than Sheridan, Wyoming
  • 47% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 7% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Powell Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$191,000 $14,364 $9,840

Powell shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 3.36, based on a median home value of $191,000 and a median household income of $56,875. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is affordable to buy homes in the Powell area.

Powell shows an income to rent ratio of 5.78, based on a median household income of $56,875 and an annual spend of $9,840. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Powell.

In Powell, 61.2% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Powell, WY:

Powell’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Powell range from $175,000 to $800,000, though homes worth more than $1 million are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Northside
    You’ll find Northwest College here, surrounded by mostly single-family homes. It’s close to the Powell Fairgrounds.
  • Central Powell
    When the season is right, come to the Big Horn Basin Farmers Market in Washington Park.
  • Southside
    You’ll be close to the main street of shops in this neighborhood with plenty of single-family homes to choose from.
  • Westside
    Live here to be close to Powell’s hospital and Westside Elementary. If you’re looking for the rural part of town, this is it.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Powell is 5.4% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 15.5%, is above both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Powell area include the University of Wyoming, the U.S. Air Force, Microsoft and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

The Powell area has an average commute time of 13.4 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Powell was desert-like when it was first established, so dams were built on Stinking River — now called the Shoshone River — to bring water to town. Here are some of Powell’s highlights:

  • Llamas Unlimited Adventures. Have a llama friend carry your backpack as you tour near Yellowstone. These tours can be guided, or you can go it on your own.
  • Powell Farmers Market. From June to October every year, you can enjoy locally grown fruits and veggies as well as breads and jams.
  • Heart Mountain Ranch Reserve Trailhead. There are amazing views of the mountains as you walk the trails here.
  • Good Vibes. This health drink shop features protein shakes and healthy coffee.

 
e. Education

There are eight public schools and 23 private schools in the Powell area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are three public and no private schools.

Overall, the Powell area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

Northwest College is located in Powell.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Powell was above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was just below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Powell has one hospital, Powell Valley Healthcare, and several clinics.

Powell has 3.56 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, above Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 but below the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 12.30 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

8. Gillette

Gillette Wyomin

HOMEiA Score: 91/100

  • Population: 33,403 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 3% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $216,400/$79,785 = 2.71 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $79,785/$10,776 = 7.40 (renting homes is very affordable)

Interstate 90 goes right through this central Wyoming town, where just north you’ll find Northeast Wyoming Regional Airport. About an hour away you’ll see Devil’s Tower, a popular stopping point in Wyoming.

a. History, Size and Population

Gillette has a population of 33,403 (2020) spread over a 23.17-square-mile area. The population density is 1,441.6 per square mile.

The population in Gillette grew by 14.8% from April 2010 through April 2020, substantially above both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Gillette.

GILLETTE MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $79,789

Gillette Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 3% Above the U.S. National Average
  • 5% Higher than Sheridan, Wyoming
  • 45% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 4% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Gillette Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$216,400 $18,648 $10,776

Gillette shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 2.71, based on a median home value of $216,400 and a median household income of $79,789. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is very affordable to buy homes in the Gillette area.

Gillette shows an income to rent ratio of 7.40, based on a median household income of $79,789 and an annual spend of $10,776. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Gillette.

In Gillette, 69.4% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Gillette, WY:

Gillette’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Gillette range from $125,000 to $500,000. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Northwest
    There’s a large golf course here, and you can find single-family homes with some extra land for that horse you want to buy.
  • South Gillette
    Gillette College is down here, and you can find a mix of single-family homes and apartment complexes.
  • City Center
    You’ll be close to all the shopping and restaurants. You’ll also find more apartments and townhouses in this part of Gillette.
  • East Gillette
    This is where you go if you really want some acreage and prefer to live just outside of town.
  • North Gillette
    In this neighborhood, you’ll still be close to the hub, but you’ll have plenty of parks to stroll through.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Gillette is 5.4% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 14.3%, is above both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The principal employers in the Gillette area include Cloud Peak Energy, Campbell County Memorial Hospital, Coach USA and Anadarko Petroleum.

The Gillette area has an average commute time of 19.8 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Gillette produces a decent portion of the nation’s coal, and there are currently 16 coal mines running. It’s a large part of the town’s culture today. Here are some places to check out in Gillette:

  • Eagle Butte Mine. One of the bigger mines in the city, Eagle Butte hosts tours where you can go into the mine and see one of Wyoming’s major resources.
  • Cam-Plex Multi-Event Facilities. There are several buildings that are used for most everything, including concerts, rodeos, monster truck shows and trade shows. There are also campsites to rent.
  • Vore Buffalo Jump. An hour away, in Sundance, this is an archeological site where Kiowa and Apache hunters used to chase bison over the cliff.
  • Burnt Hollow Trail. This is a gorgeous 3.9-mile trail suitable for hiking or horseback riding.

 
e. Education

There are 19 public schools and 91 private schools in the Gillette area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are four public schools and one private school.

Overall, the Gillette area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The nearest postsecondary school is Gillette College, a community college located in town.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Gillette was above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Gillette has one hospital, Campbell County Memorial Hospital. There are several other medical practices and specialty clinics around town.

Gillette has 1.34 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, substantially below both Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 19.54 property crimes per 1,000 residents, above both Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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9. Rock Springs

Rock Springs

HOMEiA Score: 87/100

  • Population: 23,526 | Rank Last Year: #7
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $211,800/$76,722 = 2.76 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $76,722/$10,576 = 7.25 (renting homes is extremely affordable)

I-80 goes right through this southwestern Wyoming town. Southwest Wyoming Regional Airport is only a 14-minute drive east. The wild horse viewing area just north of town is a popular attraction.

a. History, Size and Population

Rock Springs has a population of 23,526 (2020) spread over a 19.75-square-mile area. The population density is 1,191.2 per square mile.

The population in Rock Springs grew by 2.0% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 6.3% and the Wyoming rate of 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Rock Springs.

ROCK SPRINGS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $76,722

Rock Springs Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 4% Below the U.S. National Average
  • 1% Lower than Green River, Wyoming
  • 49% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 10% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Rock Springs Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$211,800 $17,148 $10,536

Rock Springs shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 2.76, based on a median home value of $211,800 and a median household income of $76,722. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is very affordable to buy homes in the Rock Springs area.

Rock Springs shows an income to rent ratio of 7.25, based on a median household income of $76,722 and an annual spend of $10,576. Therefore, it is extremely affordable to rent properties in Rock Springs.

In Rock Springs, 74.4% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Rock Springs, WY:

Rock Springs’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Rock Springs range from $100,000 to $375,000, though homes worth more than $450,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Reliance
    You’ll find mostly single-family homes in this north part of town. Larger lots are available as you go farther out.
  • City Center
    Close to all the shopping and to Eastside Elementary School, it has a suburban feel to it.
  • Clearview Acres
    You’re on the west side of town here. From the right property, you will have a view out your window like no other.
  • Blairtown
    You’ll find some manufactured homes here, but there are also site-built single-family homes as you get a bit closer to town.
  • Foothill Boulevard
    On the west side of I-80, this is a nice little neighborhood with mostly single-family homes. This neighborhood is close to Western Wyoming Community College.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Rock Springs is 5.4% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 9.9%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The biggest employers in Rock Springs include FMC Wyoming, Halliburton, Sweetwater County School District #1, and General Chemical Company.

The Rock Springs area has an average commute time of 17.5 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Rock Springs is another of Wyoming’s proud railroad and mining towns. It’s rich in history and not afraid to show it. But with all the wide-open space, one can’t grow bored with the options.

  • Museums. Museums in town include the Rock Springs Historical Museum and the Natural History Museum at Western Wyoming Community College.
  • Golf. Take a few swings at the White Mountain Golf Course, a 27-hole course with a breathtaking view.
  • Flaming Gorge Tour. Take a tour through the gorge, where you’ll see beautiful waters and large rock formations. You can also camp, bike, hike and see wildlife here.
  • Sweetwater Events Complex. Depending on the time of the year, you can see anything here, from barrel racing to the Sweetwater Speedway Race to a gun show.

 
e. Education

There are 13 public schools and 43 private schools in the Rock Springs area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are two public schools and no private schools.

Overall, the Rock Springs area has a good educational infrastructure, ahead of the average for similarly sized metro areas.

Rock Springs is home to Western Wyoming Community College.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Rock Springs was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Healthcare facilities in Rock Springs include Memorial Hospital of Sweetwater County and Aspen Mountain Medical Center.

Rock Springs has 1.94 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 13.64 property crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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10. Green River

Green River

HOMEiA Score: 88/100

  • Population: 11,825 | Rank Last Year: #6
  • Cost of Living: 2% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $213,800/$75,087 = 2.85 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $75,087/$10,740 = 6.99 (renting homes is very affordable)

Green River is not too far a drive from Rock Springs; just head west on I-80 a little way and Green River will be the next town you hit. If you guessed it got its name from a river, you hit the nail on the head, as the Green River flows right through town.

a. History, Size and Population

Green River has a population of 11,825 (2020) spread over a 14.11-square-mile area. The population density is 838.1 per square mile.

The population in Green River dropped by 5.5% from April 2010 through April 2020, the overall U.S. population grew by 6.3% and Wyoming’s population grew by 2.3%.

b. Median Income, Cost of Living and Housing Market Characteristics

The numbers below show the median income, the cost of living and the annual spending on housing for owned and rented properties in Green River.

GREEN RIVER MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2019): $75,087

Green River Cost of Living, Wyoming.

  • 2% Below the U.S. National Average
  • 1% Higher than Rock Springs, Wyoming
  • 48% Lower than New York City, New York
  • 9% Lower than Chicago, Illinois

Green River Housing Costs

Median Home Value Annual Spend for Homeowners Annual Spend for Renters
(Rent & Utilities)
$213,800 $16,812 $10,740

Green River shows a home P/E (home price to income) ratio of 2.85, based on a median home value of $213,800 and a median household income of $75,087. The U.S. average is 4.0. Therefore, it is very affordable to buy homes in the Green River area.

Green River shows an income to rent ratio of 6.99, based on a median household income of $75,087 and an annual spend of $10,740. Therefore, it is very affordable to rent properties in Green River.

In Green River, 77.2% of residents own their homes.

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Top Neighborhoods in Green River, WY:

Green River’s small size means it doesn’t break down into distinct neighborhoods to the extent of a larger city. The majority of home values in Green River range from $125,000 to $350,000, though homes worth more than $450,000 are not uncommon. Below are some characteristics of different parts of town.

  • Bridger Drive/Hitching Post Drive
    This neighborhood is close to the city center and includes Harrison Elementary School.
  • City Center
    Close to the river, this neighborhood features mostly single-family homes and is not too far from the main shopping area of town.
  • North Green River
    Still close to the river, and even closer to I-80, this is where Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Loop is located.
  • Green River West
    A nice little loop, this neighborhood west of the city center is mostly single-family homes. It’s close to the south side of the river with a couple of parks to stroll through.

 
c. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Green River is 5.4% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% but above the Wyoming rate of 4.5%. The poverty rate, at 9.0%, is below both the national average of 10.5% and the Wyoming average of 13.8%.

The Green River area is an energy hub, with local employers including the likes of Schlumberger, Genesis Energy, Halliburton, Tata Chemicals and Enterprise Products.

The Green River area has an average commute time of 14.1 minutes.

d. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Green River is a very outdoorsy town. Here are some of the fun places to visit:

  • Green River: The river running through town is a hotspot for activities: you can fish, swim, and even grab a tube and float away your troubles.
  • Expedition Island Park: This park is filled with opportunities for fun. It has access to the river, playground equipment, picnic benches and trails to explore.
  • Greenbelt Pathway: This is a beautiful scenic trail that follows the river. You can find it winding through several parks in town with restrooms and break areas along the way.
  • Green River Recreational Center: You’ll find all sorts of things to do here. There’s a pool with programs for kids and lessons for all ages, plus basketball, volleyball, soccer and racquetball. There is also a nursery so adults can have some time alone.

 
e. Education

There are nine public schools and 19 private schools in the Green River area, based on data from GreatSchools.org. Among high schools, there are two public schools and one private school.

Overall, the Green River area has an average educational infrastructure compared to similarly sized metro areas.

The closest postsecondary school is Western Wyoming Community College, located in town.

Over the 2015–2019 period, the high school graduation rate in Green River was significantly above the U.S. national average of 88%. The population of adults above 25 years of age with a college degree was below the national average of approximately 32%.

f. Healthcare and Safety

Castle Rock Medical Center is located in Green River, and Memorial Hospital of Sweetwater County and Aspen Mountain Medical Center are nearby in Rock Springs.

Green River has 1.87 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, below both Wyoming’s statewide median rate of 2.17 and the U.S. national median rate of 4.00. It has 8.25 property crimes per 1,000 residents, substantially below Wyoming’s statewide median of 15.71 and the U.S. national median of 21.00.

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With year-round warm weather and over 8,000 miles of coastline, it’s no wonder Florida is a prime vacation destination. Filled with wildlife, beaches, lakes, rivers, amusement parks, diverse entertainment options and much more, the population of Florida is growing with people that want to call Florida “home,” soak up the sun…

CONCLUSION

Wyoming is the least populous state in the U.S., and it has the lowest population density of any state besides Alaska. Its towns are small, but its open spaces are enormous. There’s a lot to learn and a lot to love about such a beautiful and humbling landscape. Experience the joy and the adventure you’ve been craving.

Wyoming is calling to you. You won’t regret answering; you’ll just wonder why you waited so long.

7 Best Small Towns to Enjoy Living in Texas

We present 7 smaller cities that are great for professionals, retirees, and families with children. Incidentally, they also happen to be places that I have enjoyed visiting with family and friends over the decades. In our examination, we’ll prioritize things that may be more important for families who prefer not to live in heavily urbanized areas…

HOMEiA is a city living guide site where visitors can find detailed information about communities of interest. HOMEiA’s City Living Guides, created in partnership with local writers, are curated lists of the best, safest, and most affordable places to live. The guides feature the HOMEiA Score, a proprietary index that rates communities on such factors as housing costs, education and employment.

HOMEiA.com aims to be the premier site for people planning to relocate, providing them with insightful content and connecting them with skilled real estate professionals.

We also empower real estate professionals to establish or strengthen their web presence by highlighting their experience, knowledge and achievements. If you’re selected to join our list of certified real estate professionals, you will distinguish yourself from your peers — and earn HOMEiA’s support.

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I’m an avid writer who often focuses on real estate, business consulting, economics and finance. Before leading business and investment advisory services for over 25 years, I got a Ph.D. in Economics and taught at the university level. I have lived in Houston, Texas and Chicago, Illinois for a combined 35 years. I also traveled to 40+ states on business and pleasure, and love writing about the great cities and small towns across the US. Read more >>