7 Best Small Towns to Enjoy Living in Texas

7 Best Small Towns to Enjoy Living in Texas

To understand and enjoy the great state of Texas, you cannot limit yourself to large cities like Dallas and Houston. The heart of Texas often lies in vibrant smaller communities. I know this for a fact, having lived in the state for close to 25 years.

Texas’s smaller cities and towns—whether they are located close to a large metropolitan area or out in the countryside—are known for their warmth and hospitality. Unique frontier history and culture make them attractive places not only to visit, but to live in, especially if you are looking to get away from urban crowds while maintaining your lifestyle.

In Part I of this series, we discussed the five largest cities in the state of Texas by population. Here in Part II, we present seven smaller cities that are great for professionals, retirees, and families with children. Incidentally, they also happen to be places that I have enjoyed visiting with family and friends over the decades.

How We Evaluate the Cities

As we examine these smaller communities, we will prioritize things that may be more important for families who prefer not to live in heavily urbanized areas.

For example, commute times may be longer in smaller towns than in, say, areas close to the Texas Medical Center in Houston. Similarly, the educational demographics, such as the percentage of graduates and the quality of schools, are more important in small towns where school choices may be more limited than in a big city.

Lifestyle values also vary. You wouldn’t expect to find a huge selection of museums, music venues, or amusement parks in a small town. Rather, you would find larger houses, less polluted environments, and outdoor activities—a laid-back lifestyle.

With the above considerations, we will describe each of these smaller cities or towns using the following attributes:

  1. Population and size, plus proximity to large metropolitan areas
  2. Unique attributes and lifestyle
  3. Median income and housing costs
  4. Characteristics of the housing market
  5. Employment prospects
  6. Education

Additionally, we will compare prices and amenities in the smaller cities to nearby large metro areas, should such comparisons be meaningful.

Some Common Factors

All of the communities described here will have certain common characteristics. Here are a few:

  1. Taxes. Texas has no state income tax (whereas the national average state income tax is 4.6%). The state and local sales tax combined rate is 8.25%. The rates may vary by area, but some places are at or above the national average of 6.2%.
  2. Climate. Most of Texas is hot and humid during the summer months, but winters are relatively mild and dry. We will mention any specific climatic anomalies for specific areas if they exist.
  3. Healthcare and Safety. None of the cities here have an unusually high crime rate, so safety concerns do not diminish the quality of life. As for health care, smaller towns tend to lack large local health care facilities, so residents may rely on nearby large cities or community health centers.

I. Dallas-Fort Worth Metro Area

The first four cities are located in north-central Texas and are part of the greater Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) metropolitan area. As such, residents in these areas have access to more amenities than those in typical small cities.

The DFW area is one of the best places to live (#24) and retire to (#17) within the U.S., according to U.S. News and World Report. Below, we will compare each community to its more famous neighbor.

The descriptions below focus on the specific cities or towns themselves. Refer to Part I to learn about the many amenities of Dallas and Fort Worth proper.

1. Arlington

Arlington sits squarely between two larger neighbors—approximately 12 miles east of Fort Worth and 20 miles west of Dallas.

Two east/west freeways, I-20 and I-30, run through Arlington. The nearest major airport is the DFW International Airport, though Arlington Municipal Airport also serves the area.

a. Size and Population

Arlington is the 7th most populous city in Texas, with a population of 398,854 (2019 estimate). It occupies an area just under 100 square miles.

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Arlington’s notable attractions include:

  • Art and Culture. Arlington is home to the International Bowling Museum and the International Bowling Hall of Fame, the Arlington Museum of Art, and the Gallery at UT Arlington. The city has a vibrant history of community theater, centered on Theater Arlington and the Mainstage Theater at UT Arlington.
  • Music and Entertainment. There are plenty of musical venues, starting with the Levitt Pavilion in downtown Arlington. Eateries abound, especially around venues in Arlington Highlands and Lincoln Square. Shopping at the Parks Mall is a treat for many.
  • Family Entertainment. Arlington is home to the popular Six Flags over Texas family theme park. Children are also keenly interested in the Planetarium Dome Theater at UT Arlington.
  • Professional Sports. The Texas Rangers (MLB), the Dallas Cowboys (NFL), and the Dallas Wings (WNBA) all play in Arlington.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in Arlington
Homearea.com compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between Arlington and Fort Worth based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

ARLINGTON MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $52,993

FORT WORTH MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $51,317

Comparison: Arlington and Fort Worth Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
Arlington $130,000 $17,004 25%
Fort Worth $120,000 $17,160 25%

The Housing Cost Burden in both Arlington and Fort Worth are 17% below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in Arlington.

Comparison: Arlington and Fort Worth Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

Arlington $10,092
Fort Worth $10,284

Rents are comparable between Arlington and Fort Worth. Using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, Arlington clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Arlington, at 9.2%, was significantly above the national average of 3.7%, whereas the poverty level, at 17% was also above the national average of 9.2% in 2019.

D.R. Horton has its headquarters in Arlington. Other major employers in the area including the Arlington Independent School District, UT Arlington, General Motors, and Texas Health Resources.

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in Arlington

According to homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the Arlington area is 16. This falls in the range of 15-20, just outside the upper limit (15) where it makes more sense to buy. Families living in Arlington must decide on a case-by-case basis if it makes more sense to buy or rent.

57.4% of Arlington residents own their home. The median home has 3.7 bedrooms.

The Arlington area has an average commute time of 26 minutes, on par with the rest of the DFW area. Over 90% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

The best-known university in Arlington is the University of Texas at Arlington, and residents also have access to national and regionally ranked schools in the DFW area.

There are 100 public schools and 138 private schools in the Arlington area, based on data from GreatSchools.org.

Overall, Arlington has a good educational infrastructure, on par with or better than similarly sized metro areas.

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2. Plano

Plano is 20 miles to the north and slightly east of Dallas, along US-75S. The nearest major airport is the DFW International Airport.

a. Size and Population

Plano has a population of 287,677 (2019 estimate) and an area just over 72 square miles.

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Plano is known for the following:

  • History and Culture. Plano is home to the Texas Heritage Museum as well as the Plano Station of the Texas Electric Railway, both of which are more than 100 years old.
  • Parks and Recreation. Plano is known for its parks and open space reserves, including Arbor Hills Nature Preserve, which stretches over 200 acres, and Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve, which is four times that size. The latter is connected by a bike trail to Bob Woodruff Park, creating a green area larger than New York’s Central Park. There are also five major recreation centers.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in Plano
Homearea.com compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between Plano and Dallas based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

PLANO MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $82,000

DALLAS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $43,000

Comparison: Plano and Dallas Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
Plano $217,800 $23,004 23%
Dallas $129,300 $17,952 31%

The Housing Cost Burden in Plano is 23% below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in Plano. Dallas is above the 30% threshold.

Comparison: Plano and Dallas Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

Plano $13,044
Dallas $10,056

Rents are considerably higher in Plano compared to Dallas. Using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, Plano clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Plano, at 6%, is above the national average of 3.7% in 2019. The poverty rate, at 8%, was significantly below the national average of 9.2%.

There are several Fortune 1000 corporations with global or regional headquarters in the area. They include Cinemark Theaters, Rent-A-Center, Frito Lay, Toyota Motor North America, NTT Data Services, Liberty Mutual, JP Morgan Chase, and Fannie Mae.

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in Plano

According to homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the Plano area is 20. This falls at the upper limit of the range where families must decide on a case-by-case basis if it makes more sense to buy or rent, with scores above 20 suggesting that renting is a better choice. This reflects the relatively higher prices of homes in Plano.

64% of Plano residents own their home. The median home has 4.2 bedrooms.

The Plano area has an average commute time of 25 minutes, slightly below the rest of the DFW area. Over 88% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

Plano is home to two Collin College campuses and Dallas Baptist University North.

There are 70 public schools and 16 private schools in the Plano area, some of which are nationally ranked. Overall, Plano has a good educational infrastructure, on par with or better than similarly sized metro areas.

The population is more educated than the U.S. average, with 93% having graduated high school and 61% having graduated college.

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3. McKinney

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McKinney is 31 miles northeast of Dallas, along US-75S and I-635W. The nearest major airport is the DFW International Airport. It is 52 miles to the east-northeast of Fort Worth.

a. Size and Population

McKinney has a population of 199,177 (2019 estimate) and an area just under 68 square miles. 

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

McKinney is known for:

  • Art and Culture.McKinney has several historic and cultural spots, including the downtown area, Chestnut Square Historic Village, McKinney Performing Arts Center, the Collin County History Museum, the McKinney Repertory Theater, and the Heard-Craig Center for the Arts.
  • Vineyards, Nature Walks, and Recreation Areas. McKinney is home to vineyards, nature trails, sanctuaries, parks, and recreation areas. Some of the better-known spots include Heard Natural Science Museum and Wildlife Sanctuary, Mitas Hill Vineyard, Towne Lake Recreation Area, Erwin Park Hike and Bike Trail, the Myers Park and Event Center, and the Wales Manor Vineyard and Winery.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in McKinney

Homearea.com compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between McKinney and Dallas based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

MCKINNEY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $81,000

DALLAS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $51,317

Comparison: McKinney and Dallas Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
McKinney $187,100 $21,816 26%
Dallas $129,300 $17,952 31%

The Housing Cost Burden in in McKinney is 13% below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in McKinney. Dallas is above the 30% threshold.

Comparison: McKinney and Dallas Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

McKinney $12,960
Dallas $10,056

Rents in McKinney are close to 30% more than Dallas. However, given the higher median income, and using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, McKinney clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in McKinney, at 4.2%, and the poverty rate, at 9%, are around the national averages of 3.7% and 9.2% in 2019.

Large employers in McKinney include Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, Collin College, Medical Center of McKinney, and the McKinney Independent School District.

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in McKinney

According to homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the McKinney area is 18. This falls in the middle of the range of 16-20, which signifies that families living in McKinney must decide on a case-by-case basis whether it makes more sense to buy or rent.

Almost 70% of McKinney residents own their home. The median home has 4 bedrooms.

The McKinney area has an average commute time of 29 minutes, slightly above that of the rest of the DFW area. Over 90% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

The best-known university in McKinney is the Central Park Campus of Collin College, which offers a wide array of programs in partnership with Texas A&M-Commerce, Texas Women’s University, UT Dallas, and the University of North Texas.

Five of the seven school districts serving McKinney have ranked in the top five percent among the Niche U.S. School Districts, according to niche.com. The McKinney School District serves the largest number.

Overall, McKinney has a good educational infrastructure, better than similarly sized metro areas.

The population is educated, with 92% having graduated high school and 55% having graduated college.

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4. Frisco

Frisco is about 27 miles due north of Dallas. The nearest major airports are DFW International Airport and Dallas Love Field.

a. Size and Population

Frisco has a population of 200,490(2019 estimate) and an area just under 70 square miles.

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Frisco is known for:

  • Art and Culture. Frisco is home to the Museum of the American Railroad, part of the Frisco Heritage Museum, and the National Videogame Museum.
  • Sports Venues. Frisco has a major league soccer team, FC Dallas. The area is also known for NCAA and minor league events.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in Frisco

Frisco is one of the richest cities in Texas, both in terms of median income as well as the quality of its housing.

Compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between Frisco and Dallas based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

FRISCO MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $108,000

DALLAS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $43,000

Comparison: Frisco and Dallas Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
Frisco $250,400 $26,400 22%
Dallas $129,300 $17,952 31%

The Housing Cost Burden in in Frisco is more than 25% below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in Frisco. Dallas is above the 30% threshold.

Comparison: Frisco and Dallas Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

Frisco $14,664
Dallas $10,056

Rents are comparable between Frisco and Dallas. Using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, Frisco clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Frisco, at 5.1%, was slightly higher than the national average of 3.7% in 2019. The poverty rate, at 4%, is significantly less than half of the national average of 9.2%.

While many residents commute to work, local employment opportunities are anchored by strong retail presences, Frisco Square (a large mixed-use development), the corporate headquarters for the Dallas Cowboys, and the activities commissioned by the Frisco Economic Development Corporation (FEDC).

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in Frisco

According to homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the Frisco area is 20. This falls at the upper limit of the range where families must decide on a case-by-case basis whether it makes sense to buy or rent, with scores over 20 indicating that renting usually makes more sense. This reflects the high prices of homes in Frisco.

75.5% of Frisco residents own their home. The median home has 4.3 bedrooms.

The Frisco area has an average commute time of 28 minutes, slightly above the rest of the DFW area. Over 90% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

The best-known universities in Frisco include the University of Dallas. There are also MBA programs run by UT Arlington and the University of North Texas.

The Frisco Independent School District was ranked #60 among Niche.com’s 2018 Best School Districts in North America.

Overall, Frisco has a good educational infrastructure, on par with or better than similarly sized metro areas.

The population is highly educated, with 96% having graduated high school and 65% having graduated college.

II. Houston Metro Area

The next city we will introduce is a part of the greater Houston metropolitan area. As such, residents have access to the many amenities in Houston.

The descriptions below refer to the city of Sugar Land, TX. Refer to Part I to learn about the attractions of Houston itself.

5. Sugar Land

Sugar Land is located in southeast Texas, about 19 miles southwest of Houston, in Fort Bend County, at the junction of US-59 (now I-69) and Tx State Highway 6. The nearest major airport is the George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

a. Size and Population

Sugar Land has a population of 78,817 (2019 estimate) and an area just under 43 square miles.

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Sugar Land is known for:

  • Art and Culture. Sugar Land is home to the Smart Financial Center, a unique indoor concert hall in the Greater Houston area. The venue includes an outdoor arts plaza.
  • Sports and Fitness. Sugar Land has multiple minor league teams, including the Sugar Land Skeeters (Minor League Baseball), and the Sugar Land Youth Cricket Club. It is also known to be one of the fittest cities in Texas.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in Sugar Land

Sugar Land is known as one of the best cities in Texas, both in terms of median income as well as the quality of its housing. It has also been ranked high among the best places to live in overall.

Homearea.com compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between Sugar Land and Houston based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

SUGAR LAND MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $105,000

HOUSTON MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $45,000

Comparison: Sugar Land and Houston Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
Sugar Land $258,000 $26,604 27%
Houston $123,900 $17,748 27%

The Housing Cost Burdens in Sugar Land and Houston are both 10% below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in Sugar Land.

Comparison: Sugar Land and Houston Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

Sugar Land $17,232
Houston $10,716

Rents in Sugar Land are over 60% higher than those in Houston. Using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, Sugar Land clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Sugar Land, at 5.7%, was higher than the national average of 3.7% in 2019. The poverty rate, at 4%, is significantly less than half of the national average of 9.2%.

The Sugar Land residents are heavily employed in the local energy and oilfields sector, as well as professional, scientific, and technical services.

Sugar Land is home to many Fortune 500 companies and other large companies, including CVR Energy, Minute Maid, Schlumberger, Imperial Sugar Company, Fluor Enterprises, and BMC Software.

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in Sugar Land

According to Homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the Sugar Land area is 18. This falls in the middle of the range where families must decide on a case-by-case basis whether it makes more sense to buy or rent. This reflects the high prices of homes in Sugar Land.

81.3% of Sugar Land residents own their home. The median home has 4.3 bedrooms.

The Sugar Land area shows an average commute time of 29 minutes, slightly above the 26-minute commute time in the Houston area. Over 89% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

The best-known universities in Sugar Land include several campuses under the University of Houston system, the UT Health Center in Houston, and Houston Baptist University.

Sugar Land has 86 private schools and 30 public ones, according to GreatSchools.org.

Overall, Sugar Land has an extremely good educational infrastructure, much better than similarly sized metro areas.

The population is known for being well educated, with 93% having graduated high school and 59% having graduated college. The many universities in the area add to the mix.

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III. Texas Hill Country 

The next two cities are in central Texas, close to the San Antonio and Austin metropolitan areas. As such, residents have access to the many amenities in those areas.

Both cities are part of the beautiful Texas Hill Country area, a stretch of the undulating country along I-35 S between Austin and San Antonio.

The descriptions below refer to the two cities by themselves. Refer to Part I to learn about the many attractions of Austin, San Antonio, and the surrounding area.

6. New Braunfels

New Braunfels is about 32 miles northeast of San Antonio and 48 miles southwest of Austin. The nearest major airport is San Antonio Airport.

a. Size and Population

New Braunfels has a population of 90,209 (2019 estimate) and an area of 45 square miles.

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

New Braunfels is known for:

  • Art and Culture. New Braunfels is typical for many Hill Country towns, with a mixture of rich (in its case, Germanic) culture and historic sites. The Wurstfest—a German sausage festival—is a must-visit every winter. The picturesque area is popular for movie and TV shoots.
  • Nature and Recreation. New Braunfels is known to attract hundreds of thousands of visitors every year. Located along the Balcones Fault, at the edge of the Texas Hill Country, the area is known for tubing, rafting, and fishing along the Comet and Guadalupe Rivers. Schlitterbahn water park (the original water park in the U.S.) and Ernest Eikel State Park also attract many visitors.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in New Braunfels

Homearea.com compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between New Braunfels and San Antonio based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

NEW BRAUNFELS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $57,000

SAN ANTONIO MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $46,000

Comparison: New Braunfels and San Antonio Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
New Braunfels $163,000 $16,572 20%
San Antonio $113,800 $15,228 24%

The Housing Cost Burden in New Braunfels is 50% below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in New Braunfels, even more so than neighboring San Antonio, which is 20% below the national threshold.

Comparison: New Braunfels and San Antonio Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

New Braunfels $11,448
San Antonio $9,816

Rents in New Braunfels are almost 17% higher than that in San Antonio. Using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, New Braunfels clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate, at 5.8%, and the poverty rate, at 12%, in New Braunfels were both higher than the national average of 3.7% and 9.2%, respectively, in 2019.

Two of the top five employers in the area include its two large independent school districts, the Comal ISD and the New Braunfels ISD. Other major employers include a Walmart distribution center, Rush Enterprises, and Schlitterbahn.

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in New Braunfels

Per Homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the New Braunfels area is 17. This falls in the middle of the range where families must decide on a case-by-case basis whether it makes more sense to buy or rent.

64.6% of New Braunfels residents own their home. The median home has 3.6 bedrooms.

The New Braunfels area has an average commute time of 24 minutes, on par with the general area. Over 92% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

The New Braunfels Independent School District and Comal ISD serve the New Braunfels area with 41 public schools. There are 33 private schools in the area, according to GreatSchools.org.

Overall, New Braunfels has an average educational infrastructure, on par with or slightly below similarly sized metro areas.

7. Leander

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Leander is located in east-central Texas close to Lake Travis, about 27 miles northwest of Austin on US Route 183. The nearest major airport is the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.

a. Size and Population

Leander has a population of 62,698 (2019 estimate) and an area of just under 38 square miles.

b. Unique Attributes and Lifestyle

Leander is known for:

  • Natural Beauty and Outdoor Activities. Located on Lake Travis, Leander attracts families and visitors for many boat tours and activities such as the Lake Travis Zipline Adventure.
  • Family Activities. There are a number of family-friendly activities, such as the movies, laser tag and bounce houses at Freedom Fun USA, the nearby Austin Aquarium, and Escape Room Leander. The Texas Pumpkin Fest is a well-known event in the area.

c. Median Income and Housing Costs in Leander

Homearea.com compares the Median Income and Spend on Housing (both ownership and rental properties) between Leander and Austin based on the American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates.

LEANDER MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $76,000

AUSTIN MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $54,000

Comparison: Leander and Austin Homeowner Costs

Cities Median Value Annual Spend Housing Cost Burden
Leander $154,500 $18,876 28%
Austin $220,500 $20,844 27%

The Housing Cost Burdens in both Leander and Austin are below the federally calculated affordable housing cost burden of 30%. This shows housing is affordable in Leander.

Comparison: Leander and Austin Rental and Utility Costs

Cities Annual Spend on 

Rent & Utilities

Leander $15,960
Austin $11,736

Rents are 36% steeper in Leander as compared to Austin. Using the rule that no more than 30% of gross income should be spent on rent, Leander clearly qualifies as a city where renters can live with plenty of room to spare.

d. Employment Prospects

The unemployment rate in Leander, at 7.8%, was higher than the national average of 3.7% in 2019. The poverty rate, at 4%, significantly less than half of the national average of 9.2%.

The Austin metropolitan area has a high number of scientific, engineering, and professional services firms. The occupations of Leander residents are heavily biased towards those fields, as well as senior management, as is reflected in the significantly higher median income in the area.

Most of the companies prominent in the area are in IT, software, and management services, such as Silicon Labs, Cirrus Logic, Sailpoint Technologies, Procore Technologies, Kendra Scott, and Informatica.

e. Housing Market and Commuting Times in Leander

Per Homearea.com, the Price to Rent ratio in the Leander area is 12. This indicates that the average Leander resident should look to buy homes in the area rather than rent.

77.5% of Leander residents own their home. The median home has 3.9 bedrooms.

The Leander area has an average commute time of 30 minutes, slightly above the rest of the area. Over 91% of the population drives to work.

f. Education

The best-known universities in and around Leander include Southwestern University, Concordia University Texas, and several Austin Community College campuses.

The Leander Independent School District has 41 public schools and 21 private schools, according to GreatSchools.org.

Overall, Leander has a very good educational infrastructure, better than average for similarly sized metro areas. 68% of the public schools in the area are rated above average, far exceeding the state average of 27%.

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CONCLUSION
If you want to escape the hustle and bustle of large metropolitan areas, the cities described above would be ideal for you. Most of them have large proportions of families with children, and feature vibrant communities where you can mix in.

When deciding where to live in Texas, think about how far you want to live from the bigger cities and which amenities are most important to you.  The cities we’ve discussed here have plenty of charms of their own, and with their relative proximity to major cities you will still have access to the attractions you may crave from time to time.

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