The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

Choosing to relocate can be quite overwhelming. Once you decide on a state, you still need to choose the right community. If you’ve decided to make Wyoming your new home, you’re in luck — it’s a big and varied place with something for all ages, family dynamics and budgets.

Continue reading as we dive into some notable pros and cons about the state itself and the top cities to live in across a variety of categories.

In Section I below, we cover some of the many advantages of living in Wyoming, along with a few drawbacks you should be aware of and some fun facts.

In Sections II through IV, we examine some great destinations for the following groups:

  1. II. Young professionals just starting out
  2. III. Families who have young kids
  3. IV. Retired folks looking to live their golden years in the warm weather

For each community within Sections II through IV, we assign a HOMEiA Score, which provides an overall assessment — based on affordability, employment, lifestyle, healthcare, education and other relevant factors — of the city’s appeal as a place to call home. Ranks are then assigned based on the HOMEiA Score(s).

Continue reading below for an overview of the best places for any type of person.

I. Pros and Cons of Living in Wyoming

Wyoming: big skies, strong winds, and open plains as far as the eye can see. It’s a beautiful state with so much to offer, yet just like anywhere you go there’s the good and the bad. Let’s look at Wyoming’s pros and cons.

Pros:

  1. A. In nearly any town you visit, traffic will rarely be a problem. The most you could be driving to get from point A to point B in any town is about 20 minutes. How’s that sound for your morning commute to work?
  2. B. Do you enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, fishing, skiing and mountain biking? Or maybe you prefer rafting, or relaxing in a hot spring? Wyoming is a jackpot for these outdoor adventures, and this is only a small list of what the state has to offer.
  3. C. Wyoming is one of the few states that doesn’t have a state income tax, meaning the state doesn’t take money out of your paycheck. You only need to submit a federal return during tax season.
  4. D. Wyoming is about 6,700 feet above sea level, which makes it a high-altitude area. While research is still underway, there are some indications that living at a high altitude could improve your heart health. Of course, always talk to a doctor first.
  5. E. If you enjoy rodeos, this one’s for you. Wyoming hosts the “daddy of ’em all” rodeo, Cheyenne Frontier Days. This event happens in the capitol, Cheyenne, during the last week of every July. There are plenty of things to do during this time: parades, a free pancake breakfast, melodramas with can-can dancers, and of course the rodeos.
  6. F. Summers in Wyoming are very enjoyable. It’s not blazing hot like a desert, and humidity is typically low.
  7. G. If you have a photography hobby, or even just like to watch wildlife, there is plenty to see, from antelope and deer to moose and bears. There are even wild horses and bison if you know where to go.
  8. H. If you want to pursue a career in mineral refining or agriculture, Wyoming is for you. These industries, along with tourism, make up most of its economy.
The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

10 Best Places to Live in Wyoming 2021

Wyoming is known for its big skies, open prairies and cowboy boots — yet it’s more than that. It reminds you that open space matters. In Wyoming, space is allotted for what’s essential, and the rest is left open for all to enjoy. It’s a place where you can relax, breathe in and breathe out…

Cons:

  1. A. Wyoming’s winters can be hard. Blowing snow hides the roads, and occasionally major roads and highways will be shut down for a few days because of this.
  2. B. Wyoming doesn’t have any major league sports teams. If you like pro basketball or football, the closest place to see your team would be Denver, which is about two to three hours’ drive from the Wyoming border.
  3. C. Wyoming is one of the least populated states, and although it’s nice to get off the grid, this can be a major con while travelling through the state. Other states have the luxury of having towns between towns, so there is no fear of having to trek 50 miles to the nearest gas station if you didn’t fill up at your last opportunity. That’s not the case in Wyoming.
  4. In fact, back in 2013 the town of Chugwater lost its only grocery store and gas station in an explosion, leaving the town’s residents and travelers to get gas either 25 miles north or 40 miles south. Keep a full gas can in the trunk just in case.

Now let’s get into some fun facts about the Equality State.

  1. a. Wyoming is the Equality State because it was the first state to allow women to vote, back in 1869. It was also the first state to have a female governor, Nellie Ross, who served from 1925 to 1927.
  2. b. You’ve heard of the store J.C. Penny, right? The founder started it in Kemmerer, Wyoming.
  3. c. Yellowstone National Park, located in northern Wyoming, was the first-ever national park in the world and has more geysers than any other geyser field.
  4. d. Wyoming was the last state to raise its drinking age from 19 to 21, which it did in 1988.
  5. e. Wyoming is also home to two of the largest coal mines in the world, Black Thunder Mine and North Antelope Rochelle Mine.
  6. f. Here’s a good one: in the state’s capitol, Cheyenne, it is illegal to shower on Wednesdays. I don’t believe it’s enforced, but it’s fun to know.

II. Great Options for Young Professionals

The following five cities are great places for young professionals to live and work. They have the right mix of a young population, good amenities and good employment opportunities, and there are many affordable places (for the most part) to buy or rent homes.

We have listed the cities below from lowest to highest cost of living. As described at the outset, the rankings and HOMEiA index scores are based on a larger set of characteristics that we have reviewed.

1. Laramie

HOMEiA Score: 91/100

  • Population: 31,407 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $216,300/$46,117 = 4.69 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $46,117/$9,564 = 4.82 (renting homes is affordable)

Laramie is located in the southeastern part of the state. The population in Laramie grew by 1.9% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Laramie is young, with 16.0% of the population under 18 and only 8.9% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Laramie is $46,117, and the median home price is $216,300 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 5.2% (June 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

Laramie is home to the state’s only university, the University of Wyoming. The mascots are Cowboy Joe (a live Shetland pony) and Pistol Pete. You’ll find them at War Memorial Stadium, where the Cowboys, the school’s football team, play. The most popular majors are marketing and business management.

Laramie is full of outdoor activities. You could go to Medicine Bow National Forest to go camping, fishing, hunting, hiking, horseback riding and more. This national forest is open all year round so you can go skiing and snowmobiling when winter hits.

If you’re more of the indoors type, and if you love to thrift shop, a must-stop is NU2U, a decent-sized antique shop with a basement level that holds sale items and costumes.

Coal Creek Tap is a popular stop for some nightlife fun. This craft brewery and taphouse has a wide selection of popular brews.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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2. Gillette

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 87/100

  • Population: 33,403 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 3% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $216,400/$79,789 = 2.71 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $79,789/$10,776 = 7.40 (renting homes is very affordable)

Gillette is located in the northeast part of the state. The population in Gillette grew by 14.8% from April 2010 through April 2020, well above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Gillette is very young, with 29.7% of the population under 18 and only 8.2% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Gillette is $79,789, and the median home price is $216,400 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 6.9% (June 2021), which is above the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and on par with the Wyoming rate.

Gillette has a two-year community college, Gillette College, which offers not only two-year degrees but also certificates in 26 different areas of study: nursing, sciences, education and business, to name a few. The estimated cost for the 2021-2022 year is $4,290 (https://www.sheridan.edu/about/gillette/). Gillette College wants students to focus on their careers rather than their debts.

One interesting place to visit in Gillette is Big Lost Meadery and Brewery, which handcrafts their own beers and meads. Big Lost has an outdoor stage where they host live music on Fridays. If you’re an adventure seeker, Gillette also has an escape room you could try called 307 Mysteries. The owner is from Gillette and wanted to create something affordably fun for the residents.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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3. Torrington

Torrington

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 6,119 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 13% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $151,100/$51,818 = 2.92 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $51,818/$8,328= 6.22 (renting homes is very affordable)

Torrington is located in the central east part of the state. The population in Torrington decreased by 5.9% from April 2010 through April 2020, while the overall population of the U.S. rose by 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Torrington is young, with 26.1% of the population under 18 and 18.5% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Torrington is $51,818, and the median home price is $151,100 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 4.3% (June 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

Eastern Wyoming College, a two-year college, is located in Torrington. Most of the school’s students study liberal arts, humanities and health professions; however, there are 24 majors to choose from. About 45 minutes from Torrington in Gering, Nebraska is Summit Christian College, if you’re looking for a four-year degree in Biblical Studies or the like.

If you have a green thumb or just enjoy taking in a beautiful view, head to Great Gardens. They’ve got eight houses filled with 1,000 different plants. They will also answer any of your questions when it comes to growing your own garden, no matter if it’s vegetables or flowers.

They’ll even help your plants through the winter. If you’re hungry, check out Broncho Bar. Ever had a buffalo burger? Here’s your chance. They also have a selection of sandwiches and even pizza.

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4. Cheyenne

HOMEiA Score: 92/100

  • Population: 65,132 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $214,300/$64,598 = 3.32 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $64,598/$10,980= 5.88 (renting homes is affordable)

Cheyenne is located in the southeast corner of the state. The population in Cheyenne grew by 9.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Cheyenne is young, with 22.3% of the population under 18 and 16.7% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Cheyenne is $64,598, and the median home price is $214,300 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 4.7% (June 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

Laramie County Community College in Cheyenne is home to 55 different majors. There are two bachelor’s degree programs available: the Applied Management Program and the Health Administration Program. If you are in the military, you could go to Park University, FE Warren AFB. They’ve got 17 graduate programs and 64 undergraduate programs.

In old downtown Cheyenne, off the main road, Lincolnway, is Paramount Ballroom, a cocktail bar with an extensive drink menu. It’s located in a sweet spot on Capitol Avenue — within walking distance of Friday Nights on the Plaza, a live music event that happens every Friday from June 1 through August 31.

Cheyenne has a mall on the main strip, Del Range Boulevard, as well as other major shopping locations. However, if you need more options, Fort Collins is less than an hour’s drive south for more diversity.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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5. Casper

Casper Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 89/100

  • Population: 59,038 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 5% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $207,400/$61,979 = 3.35 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $61,979/$10,212 = 6.07 (renting homes is very affordable)

Casper is located in Central Wyoming. The population in Casper grew by 6.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Casper is young, with 24.2% of the population under 18 and 14.4% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Casper is $61,979, and the median home price is $207,400 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 7.5% (June 2021), which is above both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

Casper College is in the north part of Casper. It offers 147 degree and certificate programs, with 16 accredited programs. The school has also been generous with their financial aid, giving away $8.7 million. It also offers a work-study program where you can work for the school to help pay for your education.

Casper has a quite a few museums to visit, such as the Nicolaysen Art Museum and Discovery Center, for those that enjoy contemporary art. Workshops are available if you’d like to learn some art as well. There’s also Casper College’s Werner Wildlife Museum. It is open to the public and it’s free to learn about Wyoming’s native wildlife.

If you can’t survive without coffee, visit Metro Coffee Company; it’s a cute shop with delicious coffee, smoothies and tea, and they have a selection of breakfast foods and pastries.

III. Cities to Suit Families with Young Kids

The following 7 cities are great places for families with young kids to move to. They have the right mix of a young population, good educational infrastructure and family-style amenities. It also remains affordable, for the most part, to buy or rent homes in these areas.

We have listed these cities from lowest to highest cost of living. As described at the outset, the rankings and HOMEiA index scores are based on a larger set of characteristics that we have reviewed.

1. Rawlins

Rawlins Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 87/100

  • Population: 8,221 | Rank Last Year: #7
  • Cost of Living: 13% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $171,700/$64,386 = 2.67 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $64,386/$10,020 = 6.43 (renting homes is very affordable)

Rawlins is located in the southeast corner of Wyoming. The population in Rawlins decreased by 11.2% from April 2010 through April 2020, while the overall U.S. population rose by 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Rawlins is relatively young, with 21.1% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Rawlins is $64,336, and the median home price is $171,700 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 5.1% (June 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

There are 4 public schools and 15 private schools in the Rawlins area. There are very few options for higher education. Carbon County Higher Education Center is the only local option; you are able to take Western Wyoming College classes there.

Tully Park is in Rawlins and it’s an enjoyable little park close to convenient stores. It’s a good place to have a little picnic outside and enjoy the nice Wyoming weather. Rawlins also has the Rawlins Family Recreation Center, where you can find racquetball courts, fitness classes and an indoor shooting range.

They also have programs you can join depending on the time of the year. Sign your kids up for football or sign yourself up for various adult recreation activities.

Memorial Hospital of Carbon County is the only hospital in Rawlins, and there are about 18 additional medical facilities.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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2. Evanston

Evanston, Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 11,714 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 9% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $169,400/$58,566 = 2.89 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $58,566/$8,112 =7.22 (renting homes is very affordable)

Evanston is located in the southwest corner of the state. The population in Evanston decreased by 5.0% from April 2010 through April 2020, below the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Evanston is young, with 28.5% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Evanston is $58,566, and the median home price is $169,400 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 6.6% (June 2021), which is above the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and on par with the Wyoming rate.

There are 8 public schools and 20 private schools in the Evanston area. There is one option for higher education — the most affordable community college in Wyoming, Western Wyoming Community College — which is about an hour and a half’s drive away.

Evanston has Uinta County Museum, where you can learn about the Lincoln Highway — the first automobile highway — which runs right through town. This museum will also teach you about the ranches, trails and trains that have made Evanston what it is today.

If you want to get outside, head to Bear River State Park where you can go geocaching; this is where someone leaves a treasure to find and leaves clues on the internet. Seekers find the treasure using GPS. It’s free and could provide you with hours of fun. You can also go biking and swimming at this park, and there are winter activities for the cold, too.

There are 2 major hospitals in Evanston: Evanston Regional Hospital and Wyoming State Hospital. There are also about 14 different medical facilities.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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3. Cheyenne

HOMEiA Score: 93/100

  • Population: 65,132 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $214,300/$64,598 = 3.32 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $64,598/$10,980=5.88 (renting homes is very affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Cheyenne was presented in Section II (Great Options for Young Professionals) above, along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to families with young kids — such as schools, healthcare and other activities/attractions suitable for young children.

There are 39 public schools and 152 private schools in the Cheyenne area. There are also a couple of options for higher education, including Laramie County Community College and the University of Wyoming.

Cheyenne is a very family-friendly city. Head to Terry Bison Ranch to see bison, ostriches, peacocks, camels and more. Terry Bison Ranch is free for the public. Depending on the time of year you go, you could see some baby animals walking around. They also offer horseback rides on a trail and, when it’s warm, free wagon rides.

If you’re paying attention when you first get into Cheyenne, you’ll be sure to see a huge painted cowboy boot or two (or 19!). The city had local artists paint the history of Cheyenne and Wyoming on the eight-foot-tall boots, then spread them across town to create a scavenger hunt. This will really help you get familiar with the city.

Cheyenne has 6 hospitals. Two of the most recognized are Cheyenne Regional Medical Center and Cheyenne Veteran Affairs Medical Center. Cheyenne also has about 20 medical facilities in the area.

Here’s what one person had to say about Cheyenne Regional Medical Center: “Not only was the staff kind and professional, but they got me processed, dosed and tested within an hour. [Their] forensic nurse was amazing!”

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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4. Rock Springs

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 23,526 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $211,800/$76,722 = 2.76 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $76,722/$10,536 = 7.28 (renting homes is very affordable)

Rock Springs is located on the southwest side of the state. The population in Rock Springs grew by 2.0% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Rock Springs is young, with 27.6% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Rock Springs is $76,722, and the median home price is $211,800 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 7.1% (June 2021), which is above the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and on par with the Wyoming rate.

There are 13 public schools and 30 private schools in the Rock Springs area. There is also one option for higher education, Western Wyoming Community College.

Pla Mor Lanes is a little bowling alley that’s never a wasted trip. Or, if you’re like most Wyomingites and outside is your calling, head out to Upper New Fork River where you can canoe and raft. Fly fishing is also popular. Or check out White Mountain Petroglyphs; this is a site of ancient ruins. The Great Basin Native Americans carved these drawings nearly 1,000 years ago and now you can look at them, too. You can also go hiking; you may even find some shells from before the carvings.

Rock Springs has one major hospital, Memorial Hospital of Sweetwater County, and about 18 different medical facilities. “Excellent facility with great staff,” says one review. “They have access to consultations and have partnerships with many places including the University of Utah. It is great to know that if they do not know, they can consult. Excellent nurses.”

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5. Sheridan

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 18,737 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 3% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $228,200/$54,278 = 4.20 (buying homes is slightly expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $54,278/$9,852 = 5.51 (renting homes is affordable)

Sheridan is located in the northeast part of Wyoming. The population in Sheridan grew by 7.2% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Sheridan is relatively young, with 21.7% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Sheridan is $54,278, and the median home price is $228,200 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 5.7% (June 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and on par with the Wyoming rate.

There are 10 public schools and 40 private schools in the Sheridan area. There are also a couple of options for higher education, including Sheridan College and Sheridan College Broadway Center.

Take a tour in Sheridan’s very own Story Fish Hatchery. This is where native Wyoming fish are bred and raised for public waters, like park lakes and such. Whatever eggs Wyoming doesn’t need, it trades with other states for fish not commonly found in Wyoming.

Sheridan is also a great place to learn how to ice skate, or if you know what you’re doing you can show off your skills at Whitney Rink. When Christmas comes around, be sure to take a walk down Main Street to see it decorated for the season, with live music and hayrides. All you need is some hot chocolate to enjoy the holiday season.

There are 2 major hospitals in Sheridan and about 14 different medical facilities. Medical care in Sheridan consistently receives good reviews, such as “The staff worked hard on making sure I was checked in quickly,” and “I love the service I’ve had at SMH. They have been kind and compassionate through some very tough medical issues.”

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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6. Gillette

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 89/100

  • Population: 33,403 | Rank Last Year: #6
  • Cost of Living: 3% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $216,400/$79,789 = 2.71 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $79,789/$10,776 = 7.40 (renting homes is very affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Gillette was presented in Section II (Great Options for Young Professionals) above, along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to families with young kids — such as schools, healthcare and other activities/attractions suitable for young children.

There are about 19 public schools and 91 private schools in the Gillette area. There are also a couple of options for higher education nearby, including the Sheridan College Gillette Campus and the University of Wyoming Outreach Northeast Regional Center.

If you’ve got a day free, take an hour’s drive out to Devils Tower, a national monument close to Gillette where you can hike or even camp for the weekend; there are pet-friendly trails, too You can even climb Devils Tower if you’d like.

Eagle Butte Coal Mines are located in Gillette, and they give out tours so you can see how important minerals are to Wyoming and the rest of the world. The tour is about two hours and only costs about $5.00 a person.

Gillette is home to only one major hospital — the Campbell County Memorial Hospital – and the town supports about 20 additional medical facilities.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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7. Cody

HOMEiA Score: 93/100

  • Population: 10,028 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 5% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $236,900/$60,404 = 3.92 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $60,404/$10,980 = 5.50 (renting homes is affordable)

Cody is located in the northwest part of the state. The population in Cody grew by 5.3% from April 2010 through April 2020, below the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

The population in Cody is relatively young, with 21.6% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Cody is $60,404, and the median home price is $236,900 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 5.9% (June 2021), which is above both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

There are 23 public schools and 8 private schools in the Cody area. There are also a couple of options for higher education, including Northwest College-Cody Center and Northwest College Aeronautics A.S.

Take the whole family on a trip to a real western experience on Old Trail Town. Several buildings from the 1890s were transported from different spots in Wyoming and Montana to bring the public a taste of what it was like to live in the Frontier West. They have about 26 buildings you can walk through with a saloon the Sundance Kid would frequent as well as the cabin he would stay in.

Old Trail Town is also only about 50 miles from the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park, where you can take the kids to see elk, bison and all sorts of Wyoming wildlife and scenery.

Cody has about 17 different medical facilities, two being hospitals and one a children’s clinic. Cody also has a VA for veterans as well as a pregnancy center and pharmacy. “We are SO lucky to have Cody Regional Health in our community!” says one patient of Cody Regional Health.

IV. Great Options for Retirees

The following 6 cities are great places for retirees to spend their golden years, soaking up the heat and enjoying the many attractions of Wyoming. These towns have older populations, good amenities, decent to good healthcare and better safety ratings than many other cities in Wyoming.

While some of these communities are affordable, others are more luxurious. We have presented options that will fit different budgets and needs, so there should be a choice for everyone.

We have listed the cities below from lowest to highest cost of living. As described at the outset, the rankings and HOMEiA index scores are based on a larger set of characteristics that we have reviewed.

1. Rock Springs

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 88/100

  • Population: 23,526 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 4% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $211,800/$76,722 = 2.76 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $76,722/$10,536 = 7.28 (renting homes is very affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Rock Springs was presented in Section III (Cities to Suit Families with Young Kids) above, along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to retirees — such as the age of the population, healthcare and other activities/attractions suitable for retirees.

In Rock Springs, 10.4% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is lower than the U.S. (16.5% seniors) and Wyoming (17.1% seniors). By comparison, 27.6% of the population are under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.1% in Wyoming.

For some relaxation in Rock Springs, visit Escape Day Spa and Boutique. They offer massages, spa treatments, hand and foot care, facials and more.

The Community Fine Arts Center is an excellent place to enjoy art exhibits and events. They offer workshops, lectures and demonstrations throughout the year and pride themselves on other ways of presenting art to the local community. They have hosted performance artists as well, collaborating with the Sweetwater County Events Complex for a venue.

For healthcare in the area, Rock Springs Community Health Center is fantastic medical facility that focuses on personal and family health. Services include behavioral health and a pharmacy. “Friendly receptionist, nurses, doctors and technicians in all fields,” reviews one happy client. Memorial Hospital of Sweetwater offers many services, including primary care, cancer care, orthopedics and general surgery.

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2. Green River

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 94/100

  • Population: 11,825 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 2% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $213,800/$75,087 = 2.85 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $75,087/$10,740 = 6.99 (renting homes is very affordable)

Green River is located in the southwest corner of Wyoming. The population in Green River decreased by 5.5% from April 2010 through April 2020, while the overall U.S. population rose by 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

In Green River, 12.6% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is lower than the U.S. (16.5% seniors) and Wyoming (17.1% seniors). By comparison, 25% of the population is under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.1% in Wyoming.

The median household income in Green River is $75,087 and the median home price is $213,800 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 7.1% (June 2021), which is above the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and on par with the Wyoming rate.

About an hour and 20 minutes’ drive driving south will get you to Lake Flaming Gorge, where you can take your boat and hang out on the lake and do some fishing. This lake is also a good place to go in the winter so you can experience some ice fishing.

If you’re a golfer, Green River has a club for you: Rolling Green Country Club. They offer lessons to a variety of ages, you can enjoy meals onsite, and as you’re going through your rounds you may see some deer, moose and waterfowl.

Castle Rock Medical Center provides a plethora of medical services, from preventative care to pediatrics, radiology and speech therapy. “I am able to get appointments same day,” says one satisfied patient, adding that Castle Rock Medical Center is “Welcoming from the time we enter the front door,” and that staff members “Truly care about our community.”

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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3. Lander

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 83/100

  • Population: 7,546 | Rank Last Year: #6
  • Cost of Living: 2% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $215,900/$57,799 = 3.74 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $57,799/$10,740 = 5.38 (renting homes is affordable).

Lander is located in northwest Wyoming. The population in Lander decreased by 0.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, while the overall U.S. population rose by 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

Lander has a relatively high proportion of seniors in their population mix, with 20.5% of the population being over 65 years of age (2019). This is high compared to both the U.S. (16.5% seniors) and Wyoming (17.1% seniors). Lander does have a relatively high proportion of younger people as well: 23.9% of the population is under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.1% in Wyoming.

The median household income in Lander is $57,799, and the median home price is $215,900 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 6.2% (June 2021), which is above both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

One of Lander’s attractions is the Shoshone Rose Casino and Hotel. Day guests are welcome to visit and play a few of their 300 slot machines. You could also be a part of their player’s club and earn rewards based on your playing.

You can also visit the Wild Horse Sanctuary, where you can see real wild mustangs and learn about the Native American culture — the sanctuary is located on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Lander.

As for healthcare, we’ve previously covered St. John’s in Jackson. St. John’s also has an excellent facility in Lander. Sage West Health is an emergency care facility open 24/7. Sage West also offers diagnostic imaging and therapy services.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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4. Powell

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

HOMEiA Score: 86/100

  • Population: 6,419 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 1% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $191,000/$56,875 = 3.36 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $56,875/$9,840=5.78 (renting homes is affordable)

Powell is located in the northwest of Wyoming. The population in Powell grew by 1.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 7.35% and the Wyoming rate of 2.357.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

In Powell, 16.6% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is higher than the U.S. (16.5% seniors) but below Wyoming (17.1% seniors). By comparison, 23.1% of the population are under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.1% in Wyoming.

The median household income in Powell is $56,875, and the median home price is $191,000 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 5.9% (June 2021), which is above the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

Do you enjoy wine? Visit Soine Vineyards, where you can enjoy a tasting or pick up a bottle to take home. On Saturdays, they have some live music and a food truck to enjoy.

If you’d rather eat than drink, learn how to make a special meal with a lesson at Savior Cooking and Wine. This business offers cooking classes with themes that range from brunch to date night to various world cuisines. Other classes teach you how to sharpen your knife skills.

The only hospital available in Powell is Powell Valley Healthcare. This facility isn’t only for emergencies; it also has a walk-in clinic, mental health services, cardiology services, a pharmacy and more. “They have the best physical therapy department,” comments one client. “I appreciate the work they do and the level of care I have received.”

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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5. Cody

HOMEiA Score: 92/100

  • Population: 10,028 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 5% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $236,900/$60,404 = 3.92 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $60,404/$10,980 = 5.50 (renting homes is affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Cody was presented in Section III (Cities to Suit Families with Young Kids) above, along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to retirees — such as the age of the population, healthcare and other activities/attractions suitable for retirees.

Cody has a relatively high proportion of seniors in their population mix, with 21.1% of the population being over 65 years of age (2019). This is high compared to both the U.S. (16.5% seniors) and Wyoming (17.1% seniors). By comparison, 21.6% of the population is under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.1% in Wyoming.

Check out the Buffalo Bill Museum. Private tours are available, and you’ll be able to see all sorts of exhibits not on the public tour; they’ll even adjust the tour to show you what you’re most interested in in the Wild West.

You could also take a firearms tour at the Cody Firearms Museum; they have up to 10,000 different firearms ranging from the year 1400 to the present. You can learn about the different styles and even the engravings that come on the firearms.

West Park Hospital is one of the more relied-upon hospitals in the area, not only helpful with emergencies but also with cancer treatment, women’s health and behavioral health treatment. Cody is also home to Rocky Mountain Vein Clinic, specializing in vein treatment.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Wyoming

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6. Jackson Hole

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 10,760 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 78% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $652,100/$73,411 = 8.88 (buying homes is very expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $73,411/$17,124 = 4.29 (renting homes is affordable)

Jackson Hole is located in the northwest part of Wyoming. The population in Jackson Hole grew by 11.8% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Wyoming rate of 2.4%.

In Jackson Hole, 7.9% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is lower than the U.S. (16.5% seniors) and Wyoming (17.1% seniors). By comparison, 20.9% of the population are under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.1% in Wyoming.

The median household income in Jackson Hole is $73,411, and the median home price is $652,100 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 4.2% (June 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.8% and the Wyoming rate of 5.4%.

If you enjoy watching or photographing wildlife, go on a safari through Jackson Hole through Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris. These are available in the summer and winter because of the diverse wildlife. They offer half-day and whole-day adventures, and even a three-day wolves and wildlife safari during the winter.

You could also take a dip and relax in the various hot springs open year-round in Jackson. You have multiple choices, such as Granite and Astoria, but no matter which you prefer, you will come back again and again.

St. John’s Health is one of the more popular hospitals in Jackson. It’s marked number one in Joint Replacement Rehab by Marshall Steele and designated safest hospital in Wyoming by Quantros. Saint John’s has also been named on Newsweek’s list of World’s Best Hospitals of 2021.

Teton Orthopedics is a highly reviewed sports medicine clinic that specializes in knee, ankle, foot, upper extremities and more.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are plenty of great places to live in around the state of Wyoming. Whether you are a young professional just starting out, have recently started a family, or are looking to retire, we hope this guide is helpful as you take the first step on this journey.

Bonus: Here is a checklist for moving — some of the most important items to take care of when you relocate.

HOMEiA is a city living guide site where visitors can find detailed information about communities of interest. HOMEiA’s City Living Guides, created in partnership with local writers, are curated lists of the best, safest, and most affordable places to live. The guides feature the HOMEiA Score, a proprietary index that rates communities on such factors as housing costs, education and employment.

HOMEiA.com aims to be the premier site for people planning to relocate, providing them with insightful content and connecting them with skilled real estate professionals.

We also empower real estate professionals to establish or strengthen their web presence by highlighting their experience, knowledge and achievements. If you’re selected to join our list of certified real estate professionals, you will distinguish yourself from your peers — and earn HOMEiA’s support.

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I’m an avid writer who often focuses on real estate, business consulting, economics and finance. Before leading business and investment advisory services for over 25 years, I got a Ph.D. in Economics and taught at the university level. I have lived in Houston, Texas and Chicago, Illinois for a combined 35 years. I also traveled to 40+ states on business and pleasure, and love writing about the great cities and small towns across the US. Read more >>