The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

Relocating to a new state can be a difficult decision to make. Not only do you need to look at the state as a whole, but you also need to consider the specific community you’ll become a part of. Fortunately, if you’re planning on making the move to Georgia, you have a variety of options to choose from. Whatever your age, budget, family dynamics or preferences, there’s a little something for everyone in this beautiful state.

In this article, we’ll present you with both pros and cons about life in Georgia along with a list of top cities to settle down in based on a few different factors. We’ll also provide you with a checklist to help make the moving process just a little easier.

Section I will begin with some of the reasons why Georgia is a great place to call home, then a few disadvantages to keep in mind, as well as some interesting facts about the Peach State.

In Sections II through IV, we’ll examine some great destinations for the following groups:

  1. II. Young professionals just starting out
  2. III. Couples who have young kids
  3. IV. Retired folks looking to live their golden years in the warm weather

For each community within Sections II through IV, we assign a HOMEiA Score, which provides an overall assessment — based on affordability, employment, lifestyle, healthcare, education and other relevant factors — of the city’s appeal as a place to call home. Ranks are then assigned based on the HOMEiA Scores.

I. The Pros and Cons of Living in Georgia

Pros:

A) Georgia’s landscape is diverse and beautiful, ranging from mountains to beaches, wetlands, forests and more. There are plenty of outdoor activities and places to explore.
B) The population is also diverse, especially in the Atlanta area.
C) There’s no shortage of good Southern comfort food and friendly, hospitable neighbors.
D) In most parts of Georgia, winters tend to be mild with little to no snow. So if you’re averse to cold weather, it may be an ideal state for you.
E) From golf to NASCAR, baseball, football and more, Georgia is a great place for fans of all kinds of sports.
F) With 18 Fortune 500 companies, Georgia has a wealth of business opportunities.

Cons:

A) Georgia is very hot and humid, especially in the summer. Mosquitos, gnats and other pests add to the discomfort of Georgia summers.
B) If you experience seasonal allergies, you may suffer in the springtime, when the air is filled with pollen. It’s not uncommon to see a layer of yellow pollen covering the ground, cars, buildings, etc. — even accumulating overnight.
C) Atlanta traffic is notoriously congested. And, especially outside of the immediate Atlanta area, public transportation options are few.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

The 10 Best Places to Live in Georgia

If you’re looking for some good old-fashioned Southern hospitality, look no further than Georgia. The Peach State has plenty of small-town charm to welcome you in, as well as big-city development, artistic expression and innovation…

Now let’s get into some fun facts about the Peach State.

A) If you’re a movie buff, there are many notable filming locations in Georgia. Popular movies filmed in various parts of Georgia include “Forrest Gump,” “The Hunger Games,” “The Black Panther” and many more. And if you’re more into television series, shows such as “The Walking Dead” and “Stranger Things” were also filmed at various locations in Georgia.

B) While most people know Georgia for its peaches, the state also produces larger amounts of pecans and peanuts than any other state. And don’t forget about Georgia’s Vidalia onions, which are famous for their sweetness.

C) Among other things, Georgia is the birthplace of Coca-Cola, the cotton gin, the Girl Scouts and the Civil Rights Movement.

D) The University of Georgia, located in Athens, was the first public university in the United States to be created by state charter. Wesleyan College, located in Macon, was the first college in the world to offer degrees to women.

E) If your destination’s address is on Peachtree, you might need some more information. There are more than 70 different streets in the Atlanta area with “Peachtree” in their names!

II. Great Options for Young Professionals

The following cities have a relatively young population, with good employment opportunities and amenities. They are also affordable places to buy or rent homes, for the most part, making them a good fit for young professionals.

The cities are listed in order of their cost of living, from lowest to highest. The HOMEiA Index Scores are assigned based on a wider range of attributes.

1. Columbus

HOMEiA Score: 85/100

  • Population: 206,922 | Rank Last Year: #6
  • Cost of Living: 24% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $141,300/$46,408 = 3.04 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $46,408/$10,872 = 4.27 (renting homes is affordable)

Columbus is located on the western edge of central Georgia. The population in Columbus grew by 9.0% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% but below the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Columbus is young, with 24.8% of the population under 18 and only 13.0% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Columbus is $46,408, and the median home price is $141,300 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.8% (July 2021), which is below the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and just above the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

Columbus has many options for higher education. Columbus State University offers both undergraduate and graduate programs, while Columbus Technical College is a two-year technical school. There are two beauty schools in Columbus: Rivertown School of Beauty and Southeastern Beauty School. Georgia Military College and several colleges and universities based in other states also have locations in Columbus.

Columbus is home to more than 50 parks. Because it sits right on the Chattahoochee River, there’s no shortage of outdoor adventures to be had. Downtown Columbus features Chattahoochee Whitewater Park, where you can brave the rapids (on the largest urban whitewater course in the world, no less), go biking or even ride a zipline across the river.

For nightlife, shopping, concerts and other entertainment options, look no further than Uptown, and don’t miss the Saturday morning Market Days on Broadway.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

10 Best Places to Live in South Carolina 2021

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2. Macon

HOMEiA Score: 87/100

  • Population: 157,346 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 23% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $120,200/$41,334 = 2.91 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $41,334/$9,816 = 4.21 (renting homes is affordable)

Macon is located right in the middle of Georgia. The population in Macon grew by 1.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, substantially above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Macon is young, with 24.6% of the population under 18 and only 15.2% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Macon is $41,334, and the median home price is $120,200 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.5% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are around 30,000 college students in Macon. Both Mercer University (a private research university) and Middle Georgia State University have their main campuses in the city. There are also two technical colleges: Central Georgia Technical College and a satellite campus of Miller-Motte Technical College. Wesleyan College, a private women’s liberal arts college, is also located in Macon.

Nicknamed “The Heart of Georgia,” Macon is a college town with a love for art and music. For outdoor activities, you can explore 180 acres of natural beauty in Amerson River Park and also go kayaking, tubing or canoeing.

Don’t miss the annual International Cherry Blossom Festival, held every March, or the Macon Film Festival every July. For history buffs, Macon has plenty of museums and historical sites, including Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

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3. Augusta

HOMEiA Score: 86/100

  • Population: 202,081 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 21% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $108,000/$42,592 = 2.54 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $42,592/$10,656 = 4.00 (renting homes is affordable)

Augusta is located on the eastern side of Georgia, right next to the South Carolina border. The population in Augusta grew by 3.2% from April 2010 through April 2020, which was below the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Augusta is young, with 23.1% of the population under 18 and only 13.5% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Augusta is $42,592, and the median home price is $108,000 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.6% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

Augusta is home to Augusta Technical College, Augusta State University, and Paine College, which is a private Methodist college. Satellite campuses of East Georgia State College, Georgia Military College and Brenau University are also located in Augusta.

Downtown Augusta is a great location for shopping, dining and enjoying the nightlife. Visit local shops downtown or take a stroll down the Riverwalk. For those seeking outdoor adventures, the Savannah River affords all kinds of activities, such as kayaking, mountain biking and skiing.

If arts and entertainment are more your thing, there are plenty of galleries and museums to fill your free time.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Florida + Pros & Cons

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4. Savannah

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 147,780 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 12% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $156,500/$43,307 = 3.61 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $43,307/$12,228 = 3.54 (renting homes is affordable)

Savannah is located on Georgia’s east coast, just below the South Carolina border. The population in Savannah grew by 8.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% but below the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Savannah is young, with 20.4% of the population under 18 and only 13.1% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Savannah is $43,307, and the median home price is $156,500 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.1% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

Several colleges and universities are located in Savannah. These include Savannah State University, Savannah College of Art and Design, and the Armstrong Campus of Georgia Southern University. Savannah Technical College is the public community college, and the University of Georgia’s Skidaway Institute of Oceanography is located nearby on Skidaway Island.

Being a coastal city, Savannah is a great destination for seafood. It’s also located very near a number of popular islands off Georgia’s coast, including Jekyll Island and Tybee Island, making it easy to slip away for an afternoon at the beach.

Savannah is known for its history, and it’s full of beautiful historic architecture. It’s also a famously haunted destination and there are lots of ghost tours you can go on if you’d like an even closer, more mysterious look at the city’s past.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

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5. Athens

HOMEiA Score: 88/100

  • Population: 127,315 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 12% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $171,000/$38,311 = 4.46 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $38,311/$10,272 = 3.73 (renting homes is affordable)

Athens is located in northeast Georgia. The population in Athens grew by 10.3% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% but just below the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Athens is young, with 17.3% of the population under 18 and only 10.5% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Athens is $171,700, and the median home price is $38,311 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 2.8% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

Athens is home to the University of Georgia (or UGA). The mascot is Uga, an English Bulldog, and there’s a fierce statewide rivalry between fans of the Georgia Bulldogs and fans of the Georgia Tech (Georgia Institute of Technology) Yellow Jackets. Popular majors at UGA include Finance, Biology, Psychology and Marketing.

Athens also has several other colleges: Athens Technical College, Augusta University, Piedmont College and Athens College of Ministry.

Because of the large student population, Athens is a thriving college town with a vibrant live music scene. If you’re a sports fan, you can easily attend UGA events — and most of them for free.

There are also plenty of outdoor activities and parks to explore. The more artistically inclined can visit the Georgia Museum of Art, take in the murals around town or check out the many art galleries, theaters and museums.

The downtown area is characterized by restored Victorian-era architecture and local small businesses. For something truly unique, be sure to pay a visit to the Tree that Owns Itself.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

5 Best Places to Live in Texas

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6. Decatur

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

HOMEiA Score: 98/100

  • Population: 24,928 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 2% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $521,900/$106,088 = 4.92 (buying homes is expensive)
  • Income to rent ratio: $106,088/$12,180 = 8.71 (renting homes is very affordable)

Decatur is located just northeast of Atlanta. The population in Decatur grew by 28.9% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Decatur is young, with 32.2% of the population under 18 and only 12.4% over 65 years old.

The median household income in Decatur is $106,088, and the median home price is $521,900 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are a number of colleges and universities located in Decatur. Georgia State University’s Perimeter College provides two-year Associate degrees that can be transitioned into further studies at Georgia State. Two other universities have campuses in Decatur: DeVry University and Emory University.

There are also two religiously affiliated colleges: Agnes Scott College (a private women’s liberal arts college) and Columbia Theological Seminary.

In Decatur, you’ll find all the great food and drinks, live music and festivals you could want. It’s known for its diverse, artsy locale and for its small-town feel but big-city convenience. Peruse the downtown shops and boutiques, enjoy local craft beer and cocktails, tour the public art displays, catch live music from up-and-coming artists and much, much more.

The city also offers Decatur 101 classes, where residents can learn more about Decatur’s history and culture and how to be directly involved in its future.

III. Cities to Suit Families with Young Kids

In this section, we describe five cities that would be great choices for couples with young kids, with a good mix of young population, education options and entertainment for the family.
While cities are listed from lowest to highest in terms of the costs of living, the index scores are based on a larger set of variables to rank them on a complete basis.

1. Woodstock

Woodstock Georgia

 

HOMEiA Score: 85/100

  • Population: 35,065 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 12% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $243,500/$76,191= 3.20 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $76,191/$16,104 = 4.73 (renting homes is affordable)

Woodstock is located in northern Georgia. The population in Woodstock grew by 46.7% from April 2010 through April 2020, substantially above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Woodstock is relatively young, with 25.2% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Woodstock is $76,191 and the median home price is $243,500 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are 14 public schools and 36 private schools in the Woodstock area, including three public high schools and two private high schools. There are also a few options for higher education, such as the Woodstock campus of Chattahoochee Technical College.

Take the kids out to hit the trails on one of the many nature areas that are part of the city’s Greenprints Project. There’s endless fun to be had at The Valley, a huge playground with play areas for kids of all ages. In the summer, kids will love cooling off in the water at the splash pad at Cline Park, which features three fountains, water jets and more.

There are several options for medical care in Woodstock. Piedmont Physicians of Towne Lake offers primary care. Other medical facilities include Woodstock Urgent Care Center and Wellstar Towne Lake Medical Center.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

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2. Suwanee

HOMEiA Score: 90/100

  • Population: 20,786 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 16% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $308,900/$90,436 = 3.42 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $90,436/$17,856 = 5.06 (renting homes is affordable)

Suwanee is a suburb of Atlanta. The population in Suwanee grew by 35.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, substantially above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Suwanee is relatively young, with 23.8% of the population under 18.

The median household income in Suwanee is $90,436 and the median home price is $308,900 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are 15 public schools and 32 private schools in the Suwanee area, including one public high school and two private high schools. There are also a few options for higher education, such as the Georgia campus of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Suwanee Town Center is a great place to hang out, and kids will enjoy the interactive fountain as well as the public green space. Suwanee has lots of other parks to explore, too, the largest being Georgia Pierce Park, which has all kinds of sports fields, play areas and trails. Kids will also love PlayTown Suwanee, a community playground built by the people of Suwanee for their children to enjoy.

There are several medical centers located near Suwanee. Among these are Gwinnett Medical Center campuses in Duluth and Lawrenceville and three satellite locations of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

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3. Alpharetta

HOMEiA Score: 97/100

  • Population: 65,818 | Rank Last Year: #1
  • Cost of Living: 26% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $422,800/$113,802 = 3.72 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $113,802/$17,412 = 6.54 (renting homes is very affordable)

Alpharetta is located north of Atlanta. The population in Alpharetta grew by 14.4% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Alpharetta is relatively young, with 26.6% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Alpharetta is $113,802, and the median home price is $422,800 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are 28 public schools and 95 private schools in the Alpharetta area, including four public high schools and six private high schools. There are also a handful of options for higher education, such as the Alpharetta campuses of Georgia State University and Gwinnett Technical College.

Keep the kids active by walking, skating or biking on Alpharetta’s Big Creek Greenway or ice skating at Alpharetta Family Skate Center. Or bring them along to the weekly Alpharetta Farmers Market during the spring to early fall months. There’s also a lot of family-friendly shopping and dining in downtown Alpharetta and at Avalon shopping center.

There are a number of healthcare options in Alpharetta, including Northside Hospital’s Alpharetta campus, which features a whole range of medical services, from pediatrics to psychiatry.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

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4. Roswell

Roswell, Georgia

HOMEiA Score: 87/100

  • Population: 92,833 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 27% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $374,700/$99,726 = 3.76 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $99,726/$15,372 = 6.94 (renting homes is very affordable)

Roswell is located north of Atlanta. The population in Roswell grew by 5.1% from April 2010 through April 2020, below both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Roswell is relatively young, with 25.1% of the population under 18 years of age.

The median household income in Roswell is $99,726, and the median home price is $374,700 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are 17 public schools and 46 private schools in the Roswell area, including three public high schools and 11 private high schools. There are also a few options for higher education nearby, such as the Roswell campus of Strayer University.

Roswell prides itself on being a family-friendly destination. Take the kids to an interactive experience at Roswell Cultural Arts Center or explore the many local parks and recreational areas, such as the Chattahoochee Nature Center, which has family events in addition to the regular outdoor activities. There are also plenty of family-oriented restaurants, shops and more.

Roswell has a number of hospital and medical center options, such as Wellstar North Fulton Hospital, Grady Health’s North Fulton Health Center and American Family Care’s Roswell Urgent Care Center.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

The Cost of Living in Florida vs. Texas

Texas and Florida are vast and have hundreds of communities to choose from. But what are the pros and cons of living in each state? Come with HOMEiA as we explore 7 crucial factors that reveal the true costs of choosing Florida or Texas as your new home

5. Johns Creek

Johns Creek

HOMEiA Score: 96/100

  • Population: 82,453 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 30% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $400,100/$122,514 = 3.27 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $122,514/$12,744 = 9.61 (renting homes is very affordable)

Johns Creek is a suburban community of metro Atlanta. The population in Johns Creek grew by 7.5% from April 2010 through April 2020, above the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and below the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

The population in Johns Creek is young, with 26.6% of the population under 18.

The median household income in Johns Creek is $122,514, and the median home price is $400,100 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

There are two public schools and nine private schools in the Johns Creek area, including one public high school and two private high schools. There are also several options in the area for higher education, such as Gwinnett Technical College in Lawrenceville and Georgia Perimeter College in Decatur.

Johns Creek is a great place to discover nature, with a number of parks and recreational facilities. Newtown Park is the spot for youth sports as well as a community garden. Another great place for kids to learn about the local wildlife is Audrey Mill Nature Preserve and Heritage Center, with structures dating back to the 1800s, woodlands and trails, live animals, play areas and more.

Johns Creek also has a number of healthcare options. Some of these include Emory Johns Creek Hospital, North Atlanta Primary Care’s Johns Creek campus and Johns Creek Family Medicine.

IV. Great Options for Retirees

The set of cities below are great for retirees, some for those who look for affordable options, and others that offer luxuries to those that can afford them.
While the ranks assigned are on a full set of criteria, the cities are presented with the most affordable being listed first.

Key economic and demographic data on Macon was presented in Section II above (Great Options for Young Professionals), along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to retirees – such as the age of the population, healthcare and other activities and attractions suitable for seniors.

There is a plethora of golfing options in Macon, for players of all ages and skill levels. There are also plenty of parks and other outdoor recreation facilities. Enjoy the beautiful trees, especially during the annual Cherry Blossom festival and the historical architecture. If you love the arts, you’ll have a wide array of theater and dance performances to watch, from Broadway to ballet to the Macon Symphony Orchestra.

Atrium Health Navicent in Macon is Georgia’s second-largest hospital and a Level I-designated trauma center.  Piedmont Macon Medical Center is also a well-regarded hospital, with services ranging from emergency to robotic surgery.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

The 8 Best Biggest Cities in Florida

For each of these communities, we assign a HOMEiA Score, which provides an overall assessment – based on affordability, lifestyle, healthcare, education and other relevant factors – of the city’s appeal as a place to call home…

1. Augusta

HOMEiA Score: 93/100

  • Population: 157,346 | Rank Last Year: #2
  • Cost of Living: 23% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $120,200/$41,334 = 2.91 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $41,334/$9,816 = 4.21 (renting homes is affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Augusta was presented in Section II above (Great Options for Young Professionals), along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to retirees – such as the age of the population, healthcare and other activities and attractions suitable for seniors.

In Augusta, 13.5% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is lower than the U.S. overall (16.5% seniors) and Georgia (23.6% seniors). By comparison, 23.1% of the population is under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.6% in Georgia.

The median household income in Augusta is $42,592, and the median home price is $108,000 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.6% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

Golf fans will know Augusta as the location of the Masters Golf Tournament.

You also can enjoy a leisurely view along the Riverwalk, with its shops, art and history museums and gardens. You’ll also enjoy taking in the Augusta Market during the spring and summer months.

You can also go on various tours to learn about the city’s history and culture, from trolley tours to boat tours.

Augusta University extends free classes, as space allows, to residents aged 62 years or older.

Augusta has numerous healthcare facilities, including primary care, specialties, and hospitals. Many are part of Augusta University Health, a network including Augusta University Medical Center.

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2. Savannah

HOMEiA Score: 82/100

  • Population: 202,081 | Rank Last Year: #5
  • Cost of Living: 21% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $108,000/$42,592 = 2.54 (buying homes is very affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $42,592/$10,656=4.00 (renting homes is affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Savannah was presented in Section II above (Great Options for Young Professionals), along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to retirees – such as the age of the population, healthcare and other activities and attractions suitable for seniors.

In Savannah, 13.1% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is lower than in the U.S. overall (16.5% seniors) and in Georgia (23.6% seniors). By comparison, 20.4% of the population is under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.6% in Georgia.

The median household income in Savannah is $43,307, and the median home price is $156,500 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.1% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

Savannah is a beautiful place to take in the historical sights. There’s no limit to the amount of history you can learn from the many museums, tours and historical sites. Beaches are nearby and easily accessible, including popular destinations like Tybee Island and Jekyll Island. There are also dining options to suit any taste and plenty of park benches from which to relax and watch the city streets.

There are two major health care centers in Savannah, both of which have received national recognition. These facilities are Memorial University Medical Center, which offers primary and specialty care and St. Joseph’s/Candler Health System.

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We took 4 main variables into consideration to determine the best places in Arizona to raise a family. The variables are quality of education, health care, personal safety, and recreational opportunities. Here you’ll find our list, along with the highlights that make each Arizona locale a special place to raise a family…

3. Woodstock

Woodstock Georgia

HOMEiA Score: 88/100

  • Population: 147,780 | Rank Last Year: #4
  • Cost of Living: 12% below the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $156,500/$43,307 = 3.61 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $43,307/$12,228 = 3.54 (renting homes is affordable)

Key economic and demographic data on Woodstock was presented in Section III above (Cities to Suit Families with Young Kids), along with information on certain amenities. In this section, we present additional information that will be of interest to retirees – such as the age of the population, healthcare and other activities and attractions suitable for seniors.

Woodstock is a great place to enjoy the beauty of nature. Walk or relax at Old Rope Mill Park or walk through the historic downtown area. Shop local boutiques and small businesses and check out the many dining options. You can even take your drink with you, as downtown Woodstock is an open container district.

Healthcare offerings in Woodstock include Piedmont Physicians of Towne Lake, Integrated Healthcare of Georgia, and Wellstar Health System.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

8 Best Places to Retire in Florida

We have presented options that will fit different budgets and needs – there should be a choice for everyone. We have listed the most affordable cities first, though the ranks and index scores are assigned based on a larger set of characteristics that we have reviewed…

4. Peachtree City

Peachtree City

HOMEiA Score: 92/100

  • Population: 35,065 | Rank Last Year: #3
  • Cost of Living: 12% above the U.S. national average
  • Home price to income ratio: $243,500/$76,191 = 3.20 (buying homes is affordable)
  • Income to rent ratio: $76,191/$16,104 = 4.73 (renting homes is affordable)

Peachtree City is located south of Atlanta. The population in Peachtree City grew by 11.3% from April 2010 through April 2020, above both the overall U.S. rate of 7.4% and the Georgia rate of 10.6%.

In Peachtree City, 18.6% of the population are seniors over 65 years of age (2019). This is higher than the U.S. overall (16.5% seniors) but lower than Georgia (23.6% seniors). By comparison, 24.9% of the population are under 18 years of age, compared to 22.3% in the U.S. and 23.6% in Georgia.

The median household income in Peachtree City is $101,121, and the median home price is $338,900 (2019 estimates). The unemployment rate is 3.2% (July 2021), which is below both the U.S. national rate of 5.4% and the Georgia rate of 3.7%.

If you live in Peachtree City, you’ll probably want a golf cart, even if you aren’t a golfer. The city’s roads are accompanied by a network of golf cart paths that allow you to get almost anywhere in town. If you are a golfer, there are a number of golf courses and country clubs as well.

Line Creek Nature Area is a great place to get away from the busyness, as are the lake parks located around town.

Peachtree City’s healthcare providers include Piedmont Healthcare and Emory University. The city also has a number of senior care facilities.

The Ultimate Guide to Living in Georgia

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Conclusion

As you can see, there are plenty of great cities to live in around the state of Georgia. There’s a little something for everyone and plenty of hospitality, good food and beautiful scenery to go around. Whether you are a young professional just starting out, have a family or are looking to retire, we hope this guide is helpful as you take the first step on this journey.

Bonus: Here is a checklist for moving — some of the most important items to take care of when you relocate.

15 Essential Steps for Moving to a New City

If you’re moving to a new city, though, the process is even more complicated. Without the ability to make a quick trip here and there, you’ll need a detailed plan to keep everything running smoothly. This guide to relocation will help you make a plan and check all the boxes so your move will be as painless as possible…

HOMEiA is a city living guide site where visitors can find detailed information about communities of interest. HOMEiA’s City Living Guides, created in partnership with local writers, are curated lists of the best, safest, and most affordable places to live. The guides feature the HOMEiA Score, a proprietary index that rates communities on such factors as housing costs, education and employment.

HOMEiA.com aims to be the premier site for people planning to relocate, providing them with insightful content and connecting them with skilled real estate professionals.

We also empower real estate professionals to establish or strengthen their web presence by highlighting their experience, knowledge and achievements. If you’re selected to join our list of certified real estate professionals, you will distinguish yourself from your peers — and earn HOMEiA’s support.

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I’m an avid writer who often focuses on real estate, business consulting, economics and finance. Before leading business and investment advisory services for over 25 years, I got a Ph.D. in Economics and taught at the university level. I have lived in Houston, Texas and Chicago, Illinois for a combined 35 years. I also traveled to 40+ states on business and pleasure, and love writing about the great cities and small towns across the US. Read more >>
Kristine Pike is a writer and podcast assistant with a passion for storytelling, organization, and communication. She worked as an ESL teacher in Hubei, China for four years before moving back home to Georgia, and though she no longer teaches, she still makes it her business to empower others in getting their message into the right words and out to those who need to hear it. Kristine is always on the lookout for new places and creative avenues to explore. Read more >>